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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smfpa.t53500107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-317-1
... Abstract This chapter discusses the forming characteristics of dual-phase (DP) and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. It begins with a review of the mechanical behavior of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and how they respond to stress-strain conditions associated...
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1.15 Percentage of different types of flat rolled steel delivered in 2010. AHSS, advanced high-strength steel; HSS, high-strength steel; BH, bake-hardenable. Source: Ref 1.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1.17 Location of the first and second generation of AHSS. IF, interstitial-free; IF-HS, interstitial-free, high-strength; ISO, isotropic; BH, bake-hardenable; CMn, carbon manganese; HSLA, high-strength, low-alloy; TRIP, transformation-induced plasticity steels; DP-CP, dual-phase, complex More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1.18 Historical and projected content of AHSS, HSS, and bake-hardenable (BH) steels in North American vehicles from 1975–2015. Source: Ref 1.18 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.1 Location of first-generation advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) in the strength-ductility space. Source: Ref 3.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.2 Location of second-generation AHSS in the strength-ductility space. Source: Ref 3.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.3 Location of future third-generation AHSS in the strength-ductility space. Source: Ref 3.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3.5 Cooling routes and microstructure development in AHSS. Source: Adapted from Ref 3.3 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.9 Energy-absorbing capabilities of an HSLA steel and an AHSS. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.15 Forming limit diagrams of two AHSS grades. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4.25 Variation of percent hole expansion with some types of AHSS. Source: Ref 4.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.1 Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) content in North American light vehicles from 2006–2012. Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.11 Load paths and AHSS used for the 2013 Ford Fusion subframe front structure. Source: Ref 11.7 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.12 Load paths and AHSS used for the 2013 Ford Fusion subframe roof/side structure. Source: Ref 11.7 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.19 Increasing trend of using flat rolled AHSS in vehicles. Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11.22 Historical and projected AHSS content in North American light vehicles (trend line only). Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 17.1 Location of the third generation of advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) in the strength-ductility space. Source: Ref 17.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 17.2 Availability target for third-generation AHSS. Source: Ref 17.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 17.8 Location of nanostructured AHSS and target date. Source: Ref 17.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 4.30 Comparison of limited drawing ratio of mild steel and AHSS steel ( Ref 4.26 ) More