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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410315
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Abstract This chapter describes the mechanical properties of fully pearlitic microstructures and their suitability for wire and rail applications. It begins by describing the ever-increasing demands placed on rail steels and the manufacturing methods that have been developed in response...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 April 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.imub.t53720321
EISBN: 978-1-62708-305-8
... Abstract This chapter focuses on the inspection of steel bars for the detection and evaluation of flaws. The principles involved also apply, for the most part, to the inspection of steel wire. The nondestructive inspection methods discussed include magnetic particle inspection, liquid penetrant...
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 51 Wire to wire bonds around the periphery of the package. The polished die surface is to the left. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.9 Tensile strength as a function of wire diameter for patented and drawn wires in steels with pearlitic microstructures. Source: Ref 15.30 . References to the investigations noted are given in Ref 15.30 . More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.16 Micrographs of the embedded diamond particles on a wire used in a wire saw. (a) 39× and (b) 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 19 Fretting fatigue failure of steel wire rope after seawater service. Wire diameter was 1.5 mm (0.06 in.). See also Fig. 20 . Courtesy of R.B. Waterhouse, University of Nottingham More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH40.3 Wire rope impression imprinted on the spacer tube due to digging in of wire rope More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 19 Fused open Vcc bond wire from PDIP misinsertion (RVI). More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 48 An x-ray image of a stacked die confirms the lower die is not wire bonded on all edges. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 57 GHz-SAM inspection of wire bond pads. A: Schematics of the sample setup and direction of GHz-SAM inspection. B: GHz-SAM image of a wire bond pad containing a crack propagating from the pad center. C: A second bond pad of the same sample showing evidence of cratering. The cracks start More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 16 Note visible wire loops embedded in the remaining thin plastic layer. DI water enhances the image contrast. Crystalbond wax can be used for capacitive endpoint thinning inside the wire loops, leaving 10μm or more of remaining plastic over the die, if desired. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 17 100X objective used to image wire prior to crystal bond application, confirming wires are still embedded in plastic. Remaining thickness ~ 5 μm. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 44 3D wire mesh model of 50 x 50 interferometer map of RST. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 A Flash memory device was extracted from the FBGA package, and then wire-bonded into a new TSOP package. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.8 Tensile strength as a function of wire diameter for patented and drawn pearlitic hypereutectoid steel wires. Source: Ref 15.29 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.12 Example of cuppy fracture in drawn pearlitic wire. SEM micrograph, about 300×. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.13 Schematic diagram of a length of wire showing orientations of shear stresses produced during torsion and a longitudinal shear band that may lead to delamination fracture of patented and drawn pearlitic wires. Source: Ref 15.47 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.14 Schematic diagram of torsion-tested wire in which a primary transverse shear fracture and a spiral delamination fracture (labeled “secondary fracture”) have developed. Source: Ref 15.48 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.15 Examples of wire that failed by delamination (top) and by torsional deformation and transverse shear fracture (bottom). SEM micrographs. Source: Ref 15.39 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.16 Torque versus number of revolutions for a wire that did not delaminate (High Si-LS-AD-1) and for wires that did delaminate (High Si-LS-400/10 -2 and -3). Source: Ref 15.50 More