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White iron

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170107
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article discusses the production, properties, and uses of high-alloy white irons. It explains how the composition and melt are controlled to produce a large volume of eutectic carbides, making these irons particularly hard and resistant to wear, and how the metallic matrix...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.7 Eutectic cementite (white) of an as-cast white iron with pearlite (gray). The gray areas were austenite during solidification but are transformed to pearlite during solid-state cooling. (a) Sand-cast white iron (3.6C-0.41Si-0.46Mn-0.98Cr-0.15P-0.024S) with carbon equivalent of 3.7 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.50 Mottled pearlitic cast iron. Gray iron at upper left and white iron at lower right of photo. 4% picral etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.46 High-alloy cast iron and white iron. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.2 Fracture surface of a white iron. Source: Ref 10.2 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 3 Effect of carbon content on the hardness of low-carbon white iron More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... Abstract This chapter covers mechanical properties, microstructures, chemical compositions, manufacturing processes, and engineering of gating practices for several applications of gray, white, and alloyed cast irons. It begins with a description of material standards, followed by a section...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... Abstract This article explains how malleable iron is produced and how its microstructure and properties differ from those of gray and ductile iron. Malleable iron is first cast as white iron then annealed to convert the iron carbide into irregularly shaped graphite particles called temper...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.5 Cooling curves (schematic) of (a) gray cast iron, (b) white cast iron, and (c) mottled cast iron. In addition to the stable and metastable eutectic temperatures, the temperatures at the start of the solidification of the pro-eutetic austenite (T ℓ ) and the end of solidification (T f More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.26 Micrograph of a white cast iron showing a microstructure consisting of pearlite (gray etching constituent), cementite (light etching constituent), and ledeburite (regions of rounded clusters). Etched in 4% picral. 250× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.46 Pearlitic white cast iron (3.21% C, 0.32% Mn, and 0.47% Si) showing the rim of cementite (note arrows) that formed upon cooling around the primary dendrites of austenite (now pearlite). 4% picral etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.49 Pearlitic white cast iron (3.21% C, 0.32% Mn, and 0.47% Si). 4% picral etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.22 Microstructure of a white cast iron. Light etching constituent is cementite, and the darker etching constituent is pearlite. The small pearlite globules surrounded by cementite in the center of the micrograph are a eutectic called ledeburite. 4% picral etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.17 (Part 1) Micrographs taken of the same field of a white cast iron by rotating a five-objective nosepiece through (a) 5×, (b) 10×, (c) 20×, (d) 50×, and (e) 100×. The white constituent is cementite, and the dark constituent is pearlite. 4% picral etch. Final magnification (a) 50×, (b More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.17 (Part 2) Micrographs taken of the same field of a white cast iron by rotating a five-objective nosepiece through (a) 5×, (b) 10×, (c) 20×, (d) 50×, and (e) 100×. The white constituent is cementite, and the dark constituent is pearlite. 4% picral etch. Final magnification (a) 50×, (b More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 16.10 Eutectic component of a white cast iron More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.8 White cast iron microstructure after heat treatment, exhibiting a network of massive cementite and tempered martensite. Original magnification: 140× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.11 Microstructure of gray cast iron. The black flakes are graphite, the white areas are ferrite, and the grey areas are pearlite. Source: Ref 7.6 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7.12 Ductile cast iron. The spheroids are graphite and the white areas are ferrite. Source: Ref 7.6 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.25 Cast iron. White regions are dendrites of pro-eutectic austenite. Between the dendrites the austenite-graphite eutectic can be seen. Optical micrograph; picral etchant. Reproduced with permission from DoITPoMS, University of Cambridge. More