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Welded joints

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610263
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the fatigue behavior of bolted, riveted, and welded joints. It describes the relative strength of machined and rolled threads and the effect of thread design, preload, and clamping force on the fatigue strength of bolts made from different steels. It explains...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.2 Brazed and braze-welded joints. (a) 0.10% C (0.09C-0.005SI-0.41 Mn, wt%). Brazed using a gas torch and silver solder (49.6Ag-15.0Cu-18.1 Zn-17.3Cd) as a filler metal. Nital. 250×. (b) 0.1% C (0.09C-0.005Si-0.43Mn, wt%). Furnace brazed using copper filler metal. Nital. 250×. (c More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.5 The strength of pressure-welded joints as a function of the deformation induced during the bonding process. No joining occurs below the threshold deformation level. With increasing deformation the joint strength also increases eventually up to that of the parent materials. Note More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 14 Examples of stress concentrations in welded joints. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 17 Geometry factors affecting fatigue in welded joints. (a) Effect of plate thickness. (b) Effect of attachment length. (c) Effect of misalignment. (d) Effect of weld profile. (e) Effect of weld toe angle. Source: Ref 17 . (f) Effect of weld toe radius. Source: Ref 16 , 17 More
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Published: 01 April 2004
Fig. 1.5 The strength of pressure-welded joints as a function of the deformation induced during the bonding process. Below the threshold deformation level, no joining occurs. With increasing deformation the joint strength also increases eventually up to that of the parent materials. Note More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 5.24 Examples of stress concentrations in welded joints. Source: Ref 5.11 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 4 Typical sections used in the metallographic examination of welded joints More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 1 Defects and discontinuities in welded joints More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 6 Examples of stress concentrations in welded joints More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 29 Mean minus two standard deviation S-N curves for welded joints. See text for definitions of letter symbols. More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 7 Relative fatigue behavior of welded joints and unwelded component (with and without stress concentrators) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
..., of the Engineered Materials Handbook. Corrosion of Welded Joints Aluminum and its alloys can be joined by as many or more methods as any other metal. The primary welding methods used are the gas-shielded arc welding processes, that is, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 11 Results of axial fatigue tests of aluminum alloys as-welded butt joints in 3 8 in. plate. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 47 Microstructure of the second weld bead of a submerged-arc weld joint in 200 mm (3/4 in.) duplex stainless steel plate. The extremely fine austenite precipitate was formed as a result of reheating from the subsequent weld pass, which used an arc energy of 6 kJ/mm (150 kJ/in.). 1000 More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 15 Microstructure of the second weld bead of a submerged-arc weld joint in 200 mm (¾ in.) duplex stainless steel plate. The extremely fine austenite precipitate was formed as a result of reheating from the subsequent weld pass, which used an arc energy of 6 kJ/mm (150 kJ/in.). 1000 More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.45 Typical dissimilar metal weld joint More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.107 (a) Outer surface of a tube showing weld joint. (b) Close-up view at the leakage location on inner surface indicating a distinct crack More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.146 (a) Weld joint with a hairline crack on weldment. (b) ID surface view showing tightly adherent smooth black scale More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.30 Higher magnification images of the regions of the welded joint presented in Fig. 14.29 . (a) Weld-deposited metal. Ferrite veins and acicular ferrite with carbides. (b) Coarse-grained region, close to the fusion line. Allotriomorphic ferrite in prior austenitic grain boundaries More