1-20 of 578 Search Results for

Welded carbon steel

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 13 As-welded hardness data for two welds in a carbon-manganese grade steel. (a) Weld 1. (b) Weld 2. HAZ, heat-affected zone. Source: Ref 14 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930217
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... the fatigue strength and fracture toughness of welded structures. The article reviews various types of corrosion of weldments. carbon steel corrosion fatigue strength fracture toughness heat-affected zone low-alloy steel microstructure residual stress welding weldments THE PROPERTIES...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930365
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... Abstract This appendix provides reference tables listing weldability of cast irons, steels, and nonferrous metals. A process selection table for arc welding carbon steels is included, and recommended preheat and interpass temperature tables are also presented. This appendix includes information...
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.76 Forge weld region of a steel hoe blade. High carbon steel (to the right) welded to low carbon steel (to the left). Region not quenched. Microstructure is pearlite in the right side and ferrite and pearlite in the left side. Etchant: nital. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.77 Forge weld region of a steel hoe blade. High carbon steel (to the right) welded to low carbon steel (to the left). Quenched region. Martensite and elongated nonmetallic inclusions (to the right) and ferrite, acicular ferrite and martensite (to the left). Etchant: nital. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 10 Effect of welding on the life of a carbon steel structure. (a) and (b) 46 cm (18 in.) long crack found in a carbon steel as-forged nozzle that was arc gouged. Failure occurred after five years in service during cold startup procedure. (c) Micrograph showing a hardened layer More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 4.5 Macrosection of low-carbon steel stud weld. Source: Ref 4.3 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 1 Buttering technique used to assist welding stainless steel to carbon or low-alloy steel. (a) Edge prepared for buttering. (b) Face buttered with filler metal. (c) Buttered face prepared for welding. (d) Joint aligned for welding. (e) Joint welded with stainless steel filler metal More
Image
Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 2 Sulfide stress cracking of a hard weld of a carbon steel vessel in sour water service. BHN, Brinell hardness. 40× More
Image
Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 15 Acoustic emission monitoring of butt welds in low-carbon steel test plates. (a) Test plate. Three were prepared; the first, with a sound weld, was used to establish conditions for AE monitoring of the others. (b) Location and number of AEs in the second test plate, which had a region More
Image
Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 17 Relation of strength of resistance spot welds in carbon steel coupons to number of AEs during the martensitic phase transformation More
Image
Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 10.3 Buttering techniques used to assist welding stainless steel to low-carbon alloy steel: (a) edge prepared for buttering, (b) face buttered with filler metal, (c) buttered face prepared for welding, (d) joint aligned for welding, and (e) joint welded with stainless steel filler metal More
Image
Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 36 Sulfide stress cracking of a hard weld of a carbon steel vessel in sour water service. BHN, Brinell hardness. 40× More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... Abstract Carbon and low-alloy steels are the most frequently welded metallic materials, and much of the welding metallurgy research has focused on this class of materials. Key metallurgical factors of interest include an understanding of the solidification of welds, microstructure of the weld...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200369
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... Abstract This chapter covers the basics of weldability of cast steels such as carbon and low alloy steels, corrosion-resistant high alloy steels, nickel-base alloys, heat-resistant high alloy steels, and wear-resistant high austenitic manganese steels. It provides an overview of weld overlay...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cpi2.t55030089
EISBN: 978-1-62708-282-2
... Abstract This chapter describes issues related to corrosion of carbon steel weldments and remedial measures that have proven successful in specific cases. The forms of corrosion covered includes preferential heat affected zone corrosion, preferential weld metal corrosion, and galvanic corrosion...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.wip.t65930179
EISBN: 978-1-62708-359-1
... requirements. The article discusses the processes involved in welding process selection and the methods of preparing base metal for repair welding. It presents the guidelines for weld repairs of various ferrous (carbon steels, cast irons, and stainless steels) and nonferrous (for example, titanium) base metals...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130503
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... and filler metals contain reduced carbon for increased resistance to hydrogen cracking and, coincidently, for increased fracture toughness. Many low-carbon steels, such as the U.S. Navy’s HSLA-65, HSLA-80, and HSLA-100, are designed to be welded without preheating ( Ref 20 – 22 ). The presence...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... are important vehicles for controlling these shrinkage stresses. Increasing carbon content in martensitic stainless steels generally results in increased hardness and reduced ductility. Thus, the three type 440 stainless steels are seldom considered for applications that require welding, and filler metals...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270080
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... The tie-rod of a 75 ton aircraft towing tractor failed during trials. Pertinent Specifications The tie-rod is said to be made of 0.5% carbon steel. Visual Examination of General Physical Features Figure CH8.1 shows the broken tie-rod. A bracket was welded to the tie-rod to connect...