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Unalloyed steel

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 1 Time-temperature transformation diagram of an unalloyed steel containing 0.45% C. Austenitizing temperature: 880 °C. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 2 Continuous cooling transformation diagram of an unalloyed steel containing 0.45% C. Austenitizing temperature: 880 °C. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 12.7 General comparison of the hot strength characteristics of austenitic, martensitic, and ferritic stainless steels with those of low-carbon unalloyed steel and semiaustenitic precipitation- and transformation-hardening steels More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3.67 Hydrostatic pressure against the extrusion ratio for different materials (Source: ASEA). 1, high speed steel; 2, mild steel; 3, soft unalloyed mild steel; 4, commercial copper (Cu 99.5%); 5, aluminum alloy 7075; 6, pure aluminum (Al 99.5) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310285
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... the composition, classification, and properties of unalloyed and low-alloy cold-worked tool steels; medium and high-alloy cold-worked tool steels; and 18% nickel maraging steels. annealing cold-work tool steel distortion high-speed tool steel hot-work tool steel mold steel normalizing tempering...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 17 Hardness differences HBS-HBW due to the material of the ball indenter, empirically determined as a function of the test hardness in the case of unalloyed and low-alloyed steels More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16 Hardness differences HBS-HBW due to the material of ball indenter in the method HB5/750, empirically determined as a function of the test hardness in the case of unalloyed and low-alloyed steels More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 19 Hardness differences for HRC empirically determined as a function of the duration time of the test force ( t = 30 s and t = 2 s) for 30s in the case of unalloyed and low-alloyed steels More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 18 Hardness differences for HRBS empirically determined as a function of the duration time of the test force (between t = 30 s and t = 2 s) for 30s in the case of unalloyed and low-alloyed steels More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pnfn.t65900201
EISBN: 978-1-62708-350-8
.... In the case of unalloyed steels, the crystalline structure of the diffusion layer is influenced by the cooling rate after nitrocarburizing. After rapid cooling in water, the diffused nitrogen remains in solution. If cooling is done slowly, or if a subsequent tempering is carried out, some of the nitrogen...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpmpa.t54480331
EISBN: 978-1-62708-318-8
... are shown in Table 14.1 . Due to its tenacious oxide film, titanium has excellent corrosion resistance (better than stainless steels, copper, and aluminum) in oxidizing environments, such as solutions containing chlorine ions, seawater, bleach, and hypochlorates. Types of corrosion Table 14.1 Types...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
...) 0.08–0.15%V. (u) 408.2, 409.2, 411.2, and 445.2 are used to coat steel. (v) Used with Zn to coat steel. (w) 0.10% max Pb. (x) 0.003–0.007% Be, 0.005% max B. (y) 0.003–0.007% Be, 0.002 max B. Source: Aluminum Association Inc. Composition limits for unalloyed and alloyed...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... are first hot-extruded and then processed into mill products by conventional forming processes. More molybdenum is consumed annually than any other refractory metal. Most molybdenum is used as an alloying element in irons, steels, and superalloys. Molybdenum-base mill products represent about 5% of total...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170021
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
... with a microstructure that is determined by composition and heat treatment. The usual microstructure of gray iron is a matrix of pearlite with the graphite flakes dispersed throughout ( Fig. 1 ). The gray irons used most often and in the largest tonnages are the so-called “unalloyed” grades which are, in essence, iron...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... is an alloy of iron, carbon, and silicon with a total carbon content much higher than that found in steel (see the right side of the iron-carbon equilibrium diagram shown in Fig. 1 ). Silicon is an important control element in cast iron and, therefore, must be given full consideration. The iron-graphite...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... is encountered below this temperature. Iron-Induced Crevice Corrosion Although frequently interpreted as a pitting phenomenon, smeared surface iron pitting of unalloyed titanium in hot brines appears to be a special case of crevice corrosion. It results when iron, carbon steel, or low-alloy steel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ttg2.t61120139
EISBN: 978-1-62708-269-3
... Abstract This appendix contains several tables listing UNS numbers, common names, and descriptions of important titanium alloys and where they are typically used. titanium alloys Unalloyed and modified titanium Table A.1 Unalloyed and modified titanium Alloy, UNS number...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170417
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
...-density element (≅ 4.5 g/cm 3 , which is about 60% of the density of iron) that can be highly strengthened by alloying and deformation processing. Titanium is nonmagnetic and has good heat-transfer properties. Its coefficient of thermal expansion is somewhat lower than that of steels and less than half...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtbp.t59310331
EISBN: 978-1-62708-326-3
... Abstract Cast irons, like steels, are iron-carbon alloys but with higher carbon levels than steels to take advantage of eutectic solidification in the binary iron-carbon system. Like steel, heat treatment of cast iron includes stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, through hardening...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320157
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
... and the alloying. Figure 8.3 is a summary of the heat-treat cycles and the resultant microstructures for unalloyed and alloyed irons: Unalloyed iron, air quench → Ferritic microstructure Unalloyed iron, liquid quench → Pearlitic microstructure Alloyed iron, air quench → Pearlitic microstructure...