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Torsion

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 15.14 Schematic diagram of torsion-tested wire in which a primary transverse shear fracture and a spiral delamination fracture (labeled “secondary fracture”) have developed. Source: Ref 15.48 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Elastic stress distribution: pure torsion. (a) No stress concentration. *All stress components—tension, shear, and compression—have equal magnitude. (b) Transverse hole stress concentration. **Tension and compression stress components increase more than shear stress at a torsional More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 1.29 Simple torsion More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.13 Comparison between failure criteria: correlation with tension-torsion test data of aluminum and copper. Source: Ref 2.7 (graphs adopted from Ref 2.6 ) More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.14 Comparison between failure criteria: correlation with tension-torsion test data of steels. Source: Ref 2.7 (graphs adopted from Ref 2.6 ) More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 22 Schematic of torsion test. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 7-14 Torsion stress-strain curves for 1.1% C tool steel quenched from 790 °C (1450 °F) and tempered at the various temperatures shown. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 7-15 Effect of tempering temperature on torsion impact values of quenched 1.10% C steels. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 7-16 Torsion impact energy absorbed as a function of tempering temperature for 1% C tool steel austenitized at various temperatures as shown. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 8-17 Comparison of static torsion torque deformation curves for L-type steels with (left) and without (right) vanadium after tempering at three temperatures. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 8-26 Effect of tempering temperature on the torsion impact properties of L2 steels containing 0.50% C after different hardening treatments. Specimens were 6.25 mm (0.250 in.) diam rounds broken at a speed of 1200 rev/min. Data from Bethlehem Steel Co. More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 8-33 Static torsion tests on quenched and quenched-and-tempered L6 steel containing 0.70% C, 0.55% Mn, 0.85% Cr, 1.40% Ni, and 0.25% Mo. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 9-13 Effect of tempering temperature on the static torsion properties of S1-type steel containing 0.50% C, 2.00% W, 1.65% Cr, and 0.25% V. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 9-29 Impact energy absorbed during torsion testing of S-type silicon tool steels subjected to various austenitizing and quenching treatments. Curves 1 to 3, Bethlehem Steel Co.; curve 4, Ref 14 Curve Composition, % Quenching temperature Quenching medium C Si Mo V °C °F More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-10 Effect of tempering temperature on torsion impact strength of O2 tool steel containing 1.60% Mn. AQ, as quenched. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-11 Results of static torsion tests of O1 tool steel containing 1.2% Mn as a function of tempering temperature. The hardness before testing is noted along the abscissa. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 10-12 Results of static torsion tests of type O7 tool steel containing 1.6% W as a function of tempering temperature. The hardness before testing is noted along the abscissa. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 11-10 Comparison of static torsion properties of an A2 tool steel and O1 manganese oil-hardening tool steel after quenching to produce maximum hardness in each steel and tempering at the indicated temperatures. Data from Teledyne VASCO More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 11-11 Effect of tempering temperature on the torsion impact energy for an A2 steel air cooled from 970 °C (1775 °F). Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 12-15 Comparison of ductility in static torsion tests of D3 (left) and D2 (right) tool steels quenched to maximum hardness and tempered at the three temperatures shown. Data from Teledyne VASCO More