1-20 of 866 Search Results for

Surface-hardened steel

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract This chapter discusses the process characteristics, advantages, disadvantages, and applications of various processes involved in surface hardening of steel. These include pack carburizing, liquid carburizing, gas carburizing, vacuum carburizing, plasma carburizing, gas nitriding...
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 7.5 Schematic coil-current-versus-time curve for a steel bar surface hardened by an induction heating method. The times t m and t p separate the three stages f, f/p, and p. From J. D. Verhoeven, H. L. Downing, and E. D. Gibson, Journal of Heat Treating , Vol 4, No. 3, June, 1986, p 253 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.smnm.t52140189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-264-8
... Abstract The design requirements for mechanical shafts, pinions, and gears often call for features with very hard surfaces (to resist wear) based on a softer core (to avoid brittle fracture). This chapter explains how to selectively harden steel by diffusing carbon and nitrogen atoms...
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 78 Maximum temperature drop as a function of depth in the induction surface-hardened steel at various speed, V w . Source: Ref 65 More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.11 Effect of starting microstructure in 1070 steel bars on surface-hardening response using a 450-kHz induction generator operated at a power density of 2.5 kW/cm 2 (15.9 kWjin. 2 ). From T. H. Spencer, et al., Induction Hardening and Tempering , ASM, Metals Park, OH, 1964 ( Ref 7 ) More
Image
Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 7.6 Case depth obtained by induction surface hardening of a steel bar as a function of ∫   I c 2 dt , where l c and t denote induction coil current and time, respectively. From J. D. Verhoeven, H. L. Downing, and E. D. Gibson, Journal of Heat Treating , Vol 4, No. 3, June More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 19 Typical examples of induction surface hardening of (a) carbon steel and (b) alloyed steel gears produced from carbon steel (a) and alloyed steel (b) More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.31 Surface hardening of steel by induction. (a) Tooth-by-tooth induction hardening of a gear. (b) Hardening of hammerheads. Courtesy of Ajax Tocco Magnethermic More
Image
Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 7-19 Fracture surfaces of hardened 52100 steel after austenitizing at 850 °C (1560 °F) (a) and 965 °C (1770 °F) (b). Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1998
Fig. 9-2 Effect of hardening temperature on the surface hardness of various S1 steels. Curves 1 and 5, Allegheny Ludlum Industries; Curves 2 and 3, Bethlehem Steel Co.; curve 4, Latrobe Steel Co. Curve Composition, % Quenching medium Specimen size C Si W Cr V 1 0.43 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... for one-hour tool life versus Brinell hardness number for various through-hardened carbon and alloy steels Fig. 9 Hardness vs. distance from the surface of direct-cooled gas-carburized SAE 4320 steel. Superimposed on the hardness profile is the range of critical depths (vertical dashed band...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130417
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... surface hardening, residual stresses after induction surface hardening and finish grinding, and input and output control of steel for induction surface hardening of gears. induction hardening quenching magnetic flux concentrators time-temperature dependence gears steel residual stress...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... are discussed. carbonitriding carburizing case hardening nitriding nitrocarburizing steel CASE HARDENING—the production of parts that have hard, wear-resistant surfaces, but with softer and/or tougher cores—can be accomplished by two distinct methods. One approach is to use a grade of steel...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.secwr.t68350087
EISBN: 978-1-62708-315-7
... properties of the steel or cast iron component. In this section, surface hardening is limited to localized heat treating processes that produce a hard quenched surface without introducing additional alloying species. This approach consists of hardening the surface by flame, induction, laser-beam, or electron...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440159
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... is one of the oldest methods of producing a part with a hard surface and a relatively soft core without altering composition, is involved with each of these surface hardening methods. Although the part is heated throughout the section, a low-hardenability steel transforms to the austenitic state from...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... been placed on the residual stresses developed during carburizing because these are additive to the applied stresses. Why Carburize Case-Harden? With some through-hardening steels, it is possible to develop hardnesses equal to the surface hardnesses typical of case-hardening parts; however...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440275
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... to be depleted. Decarburization not only results in a loss of surface hardness in any untreated or hardened steel surface but also causes a degradation of mechanical properties, or even cracking (during hardening)—under certain conditions. Decarburization can result in the total loss of base material carbon...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250249
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... to a slow air cool, depending on the composition of the steel. Typical hardnesses obtained by quenching in air or water are given in Table 5 . Flame hardening involves the direct impingement of oxyfuel gas flames from suitably designed and positioned burners onto the surface area to be hardened...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htgpge.t67320175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-347-8
... composition of the surface layers. It is possible to do so by very rapid heating with electrical induction for a short period, thus conditioning the surface for hardening by quenching, provided the steel used contains sufficient carbon to respond to hardening. Because the heating is done by electrical...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410499
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Mechanical components often require surface treatments to meet application demands. This chapter describes several surface hardening treatments for steel and their effect on microstructure, composition, and properties. It discusses flame hardening, induction heating, carburizing, nitriding...