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Sulfurization

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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 4.16 Sulfur print of a steel rail showing regions of sulfur segregation. 1× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 The sulfur cycle showing the role of bacteria in oxidizing elemental sulfur to sulfate ( SO 4 2 − ) and in reducing sulfate to sulfide (S 2– ). Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 30 September 2023
Figure 5.10: Lubrication of a steel surface by sulfur, where sulfide layers act as a boundary lubricant. More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.9 Effect of sulfur content and specimen orientation on the upper shelf impact energy of rolled carbon steel plate. Source: Ref 9.38 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 9.10 Effect of sulfur content and specimen orientation on impact toughness as a function of test temperature for 4340 plate steels hardened and tempered to two strength levels. Source: Ref 9.39 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.8 Influence of sulfur content and steelmaking practice on temperature ranges for overheating and burning. Steelmaking practices are: consumable-electrode vacuum arc remelted (CEVAM), basic-electric (BE), and open-hearth (OH). Source: Ref 19.22 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 34 Erosion-corrosion of lead as a function of sulfuric acid concentration. Velocity, 12 m/s (39 ft/s); temperature, 95 °C (203 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 17 Corrosion rate of steel as a function of sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) concentration More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 18 Corrosion of steel by sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and temperature More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 21 Comparative behavior of several nickel-base alloys in pure sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ). The isocorrosion lines indicate a corrosion rate of 0.5 mm/year (20 mils/year). More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 24 Stress-corrosion cracking behavior of nickel with phosphorus and sulfur segregation. (a) Polarization curve for nickel in 1 N H 2 SO 4 at 25 °C (77 °F). (b) Strain to failure and percent intergranular fracture for 26% phosphorus segregation at grain boundaries. (c) Strain to failure More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Effect of sulfur on stainless machinability. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 8 Comparison of machinability of AISI 303 at different sulfur levels with and without the Ugima oxide. The vertical axis, VB30/0.3, represents 0.3 mm of tool wear in 30 min. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 4 Metal flow directions in a weld pool with (left) and without (right) sulfur. Source: Adapted from Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 1 Isocorrosion chart for sulfuric acid. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.26 Stress-corrosion cracking behavior of nickel with phosphorus and sulfur segregation, (a) Polarization curve for nickel in 1 NH 2 SO 4 at 25 °C (77 °F). (b) Strain-to-failure and percent intergranular fracture for 26% phosphorus segregation of grain boundaries. (c) Strain-to-failure More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.17 Effect of sulfur on SCC of two-point bend samples of Ni-Fe-Cr-Mo alloys in 25% NaCl + 0.7 MPa H 2 S (RT) at 204 °C (400 °F). NC, no cracking. Source: Ref 5.55 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 5.39 Interrelationships among cathodic current density, grain-boundary sulfur composition, and fracture mode in straining electrode tests of nickel. Source: Ref 5.174 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 8.16 (Part 2) (e) Picral. 50×. (f) Nitric-sulfuric. 50×. (g) Scanning electron micrograph of fracture surface. 50×. (h) Scanning electron micrograph of fracture surface. 250×. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5 Corrosion table for stainless steels and titanium in sulfuric acid plus copper sulfate. Corrosion rate legend: 0, < 0.1 mm/yr (corrosion resistant); 1, 0.1–1 mm/yr (useful in certain circumstances); 2, > 1.0 mm/yr (material not recommended). Source: Ref 8 ; see source More