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Striations

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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 9 Fatigue striations in low-carbon alloy steel (8620). This scanning electron microscope fractograph shows the roughly horizontal ridges, which are the advance of the crack front with each load application. The crack progresses in the direction of the arrow. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 61 Typical fatigue striations in 7075 aluminum More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 67 SEM examination of the fracture surface. (a) Fatigue striations emanating from the fracture origin. (b) Machining marks found on the surface of the inner bore. (c) Well-defined layer showing fatigue emanating from the damaged material at the surface of the inner bore More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 14 Fatigue striations in (a) interstitial-free steel and (b) aluminum alloy AA2024-T42. (c) Fatigue fracture surface of a cast aluminum alloy where a fatigue crack was nucleated from a casting defect, presenting solidification dendrites on the surface. Arrow at top right indicates fatigue More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 81 SEM micrograph of representative fatigue striations found on the bolt fracture surfaces (2 μm) More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.136 (a) SEM image with fatigue striations on the fracture surface of a stainless steel tube, 1000×. (b) Microstructure indicating transgranular cracks with blunt tip and filled with oxide, 400× More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.139 (a) SEM image of fracture surface indicating fatigue striations with oxidized nature of rupture surface, 1000×. (b) Microstructure of a tube with ferrite and bainite as the phases with typical thermal faigue crack having blunt tip, 100× More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.162 SEM micrograph giving crack surface view. Fatigue striations along with scattered corrosion deposits are shown. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 5 Example of well-formed striations in a forged high-pressure compressor blade made of titanium alloy. The striation density is approximately 30,000 striations/in. (~3.3 × 10 –5 in./striation). The arrow denotes the crack propagation direction. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 6 Example of well-formed fatigue striations in titanium alloy ( R = 0.05; maximum alternating stress, 105 ksi). ( R is the minimum stress divided by the maximum stress.) The striation density is approximately 263,000 striations/in. (~3.8 × 10 –6 in./striation). The arrow denotes the crack More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 7 Striations generated on a spectrum-loaded test article. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 15 Plot of fatigue striations as a function of depth, showing the expected increasing crack growth rate with increasing depth. More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 9.5 Electron micrograph of a surface replica showing fine, parallel striations (region A) on a transgranular SCC fracture. Source: Ref 9.57 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.28 Transmission electron fractograph showing coarse and fine striations of aluminum alloy from a fatigue test with spectrum (variable amplitude) loading. Striation spacing varies according to loading, which consisted of ten cycles at a high stress alternating with ten cycles at a lower More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3(b) Higher magnification view illustrating fatiguelike striations in the pit. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.26 Transmission electron micrography (TEM) of ductile fatigue striations in 7178 aluminum alloy. Arrow indicates the cracking direction. Source. Ref 3.18 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.27 Schematic of different types of ductile and brittle striations. Source: Ref 3.19 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.28 TEM of brittle striations in a 2014 aluminum alloy that failed in service. Note the cleavage facets running parallel to the direction of crack propagation and normal to the fatigue striations. Arrow indicates the cracking direction. Source: Ref 3.18 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 7.18 Fatigue striations in PMMA. Arrow indicates crack growth direction. Source: Ref 7.27 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 31 Scanning electron micrograph showing fatigue striations. Source: Ref 2 More