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Stress-intensity

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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 18.18 Concept of threshold stress intensity ( K Iscc ). K Ic , fracture stress intensity More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.20 Stress corrosion cracking velocity versus stress intensity factor. (a) Type A, dotted line; type B, solid line. (b) Type C behavior More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 5.34 Center-cracked panel stress-intensity solutions based on the stress extrapolation method. Source: Ref 5.7 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 14 The effect of electrode potential and stress intensity on stress corrosion crack velocity in a high strength aluminum alloy (7079-T651). 2.5 cm thick plate. T-L crack orientation (long transverse grain direction normal to the fracture plane; longitudinal direction of crack propagation More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 15 Effect of temperature and stress intensity on the stress-corrosion crack velocity in high-strength aluminum alloy (7039-T61) exposed to distilled water. 2.5 cm thick plate. S-L crack orientation (short transverse grain direction normal to the fracture plane; longitudinal direction More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 4.7 Effect of stress intensity on the growth rate of stress corrosion cracks in type 304L stainless steel exposed to magnesium chloride and sodium chloride solutions. After Ref 4.27 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 4.8 Effect of nickel content on the stress-corrosion threshold stress intensity of various alloys in an aerated aqueous 22% NaCl solution at 105 °C (220 °F). Alloys X and Y are German heat-resistant grades. After Ref 4.27 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.104 Effect of stress intensity on stress-corrosion crack growth rate for type 304L stainless steel in aerated MgCl 2 at 130 °C. Symbols indicate whether propagation occurs as a single or branched crack. Source: Ref 165 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.109 Effect of stress intensity on the growth rate of stress-corrosion cracks in several austenitic stainless steels. Alloy compositions can be found in Ref 166 . Redrawn from Ref 166 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.110 Effect of nickel content on stress-corrosion threshold stress intensity of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys with about 18% Cr. Alloy compositions can be found in Ref 166 . 2H = AISI 431, untempered martensite. 4S = AISI 431, sensitized. Source: Ref 166 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.111 Effect of molybdenum content on stress-corrosion threshold stress intensity of austenitic stainless steels. Source: Ref 166 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.113 Dependence of stress-corrosion-crack-growth rate on stress intensity of a high-strength aluminum alloy in several aqueous environments. Crack orientation TL (stress in transverse direction; crack propagation in longitudinal direction). Source: Ref 159 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.114 Dependence of stress-corrosion-crack-growth rate on stress intensity for a high-strength aluminum alloy at various temperatures. Source: Ref 159 More
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Published: 01 July 2000
Fig. 7.115 Dependence of stress-corrosion-crack-growth rate on stress intensity for a high-strength aluminum alloy at several relative humidities. Crack orientation TL (stress in transverse direction, crack propagation in longitudinal direction). Source: Ref 159 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 13 Effect of stress intensity on the growth rate of stress-corrosion cracks in type 304L stainless steel exposed to magnesium chloride and sodium chloride solutions More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 14 Effect of nickel content on the stress-corrosion threshold stress intensity of various alloys in an aerated aqueous 22% NaCl solution at 105 °C (220 °F). Alloys X and Y are German heat-resistant grades. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.25 Fatigue crack growth per fatigue cycle ( da / dN ) versus stress intensity variation ( Δ K ) per cycle. The C and n are constants that can be obtained from the intercept and slope, respectively, of the linear log da / dN versus log Δ K plot. This equation for fatigue crack More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.26 Fatigue crack growth rate ( R = 0.1) versus stress-intensity factor at room temperature for A356.0-T6 aluminum alloy castings produced by various processes More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.27 Fatigue crack growth rate ( R = 0.5) versus stress-intensity factor at room temperature for A356.0-T6 aluminum alloy castings produced by various processes More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 8.29 Creep crack growth as a function of applied stress-intensity factor for selected wrought aluminum alloys More