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Space Shuttle

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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 21.11 Space shuttle carbon-carbon applications. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 21.12 Fabrication sequence for space shuttle carbon-carbon parts. Carbon-carbon (C-C) More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 21.13 Coating sequence for space shuttle carbon-carbon parts. Carbon-carbon (C-C), silicon carbide (SiC), tetraethylortho-silicate (TEOS) More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.11 Space Shuttle orbiter isotherms for a typical trajectory. Source: Ref 11.6 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.12 Thermal protection system materials for the U.S. Space Shuttle. More than 30,000 ceramic tiles are included in the system. Other materials making up the system are reinforced carbon-carbon composites (44 panels and the nose cap) and 333 m 2 (3581 ft 2 ) of felt reusable surface More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.19 Fabrication sequence for Space Shuttle carbon-carbon (C-C) parts. Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 11.20 Coating sequence for Space Shuttle carbon-carbon (C-C) parts. TEOS, tetraethylorthosilicate. Source: Ref 11.1 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 10.1 The United States Space Shuttle sitting on the launch pad in Florida More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 10.2 Comparison of fatigue regimes encountered in the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) and that encountered in aeronautical gas turbine engines More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 10.3 Cut-away view of the Space Shuttle Main Engine showing components and gas paths More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2 Space Shuttle main engine More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 64 Hydrogen embrittlement failure of a 300 M steel space shuttle orbiter nose landing gear steering collar pin. The pin was heat treated to a 1895-MPa (275 ksi) strength level. The part was plated with chromium and titanium-cadmium. (a) Pin showing location of failure (actual size). (b More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fdmht.t52060231
EISBN: 978-1-62708-343-0
...Abstract Abstract This chapter explains how the authors assessed the potential risks of creep-fatigue in several aerospace applications using the tools and techniques presented in earlier chapters. It begins by identifying the fatigue regimes encountered in the main engines of the Space Shuttle...
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.21 Friction stir weld process development tool at the Marshall Space Flight Center shown with an 8.2 m (27 ft) diameter barrel segment of the 2195 Al-Li external tank for the Space Shuttle at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 2.45 Friction stir weld process development tool at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) shown with an 8.2 m (27 ft) diameter barrel segment of the 2195 aluminum-lithium Space Shuttle. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. Courtesy More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 10.13 Near-term fix to prevent aerodynamic excitation of preburner fuel nozzles in Space Shuttle Main Engines by inserting spacers to limit nozzle tip displacement More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 10.5 Half-cycles of thermal strain-induced hysteresis. (a) Thermal down-shock followed by equilibrium temperatures. (b) Thermal up-shock following Space Shuttle Main Engine firing More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 7 Crevice corrosion of an anodized aluminum alloy 2024-T851 window frame from the space shuttle Challenger . Corrosion occurred along both thermal and environmental sealing grooves. (a) Window frame showing locations of corrosion (arrows). (b) Enlargement of (a) showing corrosion in Viton More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.horfi.t51180001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-256-3
... is a failure because these items are now space debris. Like the ISS and the Space Shuttle, the space debris also travels at 7,823 m/s (17,500 mph)—though not necessarily in the same direction or at the same altitude. We can currently track more than 9000 pieces of such debris, and we just keep adding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... satellite were exposed to low Earth orbit for 5.8 years before a last-minute retrieval by the space shuttle Columbia. The jagged peaks and valleys seen in these micrographs were created by the extremely erosive nature of atomic oxygen, the primary atmospheric constituent at the LDEF mission altitudes...