1-20 of 323 Search Results for

Solvents

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1.7 Voids found in a glass fiber composite cross section due to solvents from manufacturing. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 13.4 Solvent-generated voids in the prepreg skins and fillet areas of a honeycomb sandwich structure composite. (a and b) Bag side. (c) Tool side. Epi-bright-field illumination, 5× objective. In these micrographs, there is evidence of some scratching on the polished surface. This is due More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 6.23 Schematic outline of slip casting, starting with a solvent-rich feedstock that is poured into a porous mold, where the liquid seeps into the mold pores. After drying, the powder has taken on the shape of the cavity. Hollow shapes hold the slip in the mold for a few minutes More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.11 Binder-extraction data at two temperatures for solvent-immersion extraction of paraffin wax. Source: Camargo et al. ( Ref 5 ) More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.12 Solvent-extraction data from Fig. 7.11 replotted using the linearized form suggested by Eq 7.3 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.31 Laser dilatometer data collected on the dimensional change during solvent binder (PW, paraffin wax; PP, polypropylene; PE, polyethylene) removal for a carbonyl iron powder compact immersed in heptane. The compacts undergo sudden swelling at the start of the exposure but slowly shrink More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.32 Binder removal by solvent immersion initially progresses rapidly, but as dissolution is from greater depth in the pores, the process dramatically slows. These 60 °C (140 °F) heptane immersion data are for an iron powder compact injection molded with a binder consisting of paraffin More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.33 Schematic for binder removal by using solvent vapors. The vapor is generated inside the chamber. Vapor condensed on the components dissolves the binder, accumulates mass, and drips off the component. The effect is binder removal and concentration in the solvent bath. More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.34 Solvent immersion data for 2 μm silicon nitride in water, where polyethylene glycol in the binder dissolves according to Eq 7.3 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.26 First-stage solvent debinding of 0.9 μm carbide powder where the oil-wax portion of the binder is removed by immersion in heptane at 30 or 40 °C (85 or 105 °F). Source: Qu et al. ( Ref 13 , 14 , 15 ) More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.35 Solvent immersion debinding data for 0.8 μm alumina. Trials over several hours are reported for three temperatures, showing more rapid filler-phase removal as temperature increases. Source: Oliveira et al. ( Ref 22 ) More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Liquid chromatographic system. 1, solvent delivery pumping system; 2, autosampling/injection system; 3, interactive controller for solvent mixing and system automation; 4, ultraviolet detectors; 5, differential refractometer; 6, data-handling computer. The column is not visible More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 HPLC method sorbent (a) and solvent (b) selection guides. Source: Alltech Associates More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 Solvent effects on GPC separation of MY-720/DDS More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 13 Infrared stack plot for percentage DDS determination. Solvent: 10% THF, 90% CHCl 3 More
Image
Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 7.3 Solvent extraction of beryllium from sulfate solutions at the Delta plant in Utah by Brush Resources, Inc. HDEHP, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5.20 Motion of solvent atoms and solute atoms according to the grain-boundary movement. (a) Transfer of solvent atoms. (b) Drag of solute atoms More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sfa.t52780141
EISBN: 978-1-62708-268-6
... equipment and cutting oils. In a subsequent operation, Litton cleaned the titanium parts by wiping them and then using ultrasonic cleaning equipment. The ultrasonic cleaner contained a solvent to dissolve and wash away the cutting oils. (Ultrasonic vibration helped the solvent penetrate into all areas...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030147
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
... Fig. 8.1 Glass fabric composite that has high void content. Void areas are due to residual solvent from the prepregging process. Bright-field illumination, 10× objective Fig. 8.4 Entrapped air voids in a tubular composite part made with unidirectional carbon fiber prepreg. Slightly...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.omfrc.t53030237
EISBN: 978-1-62708-349-2
..., solvents (chemicals), fatigue, excessive loading, and combinations of these environmental conditions. This chapter discusses the effects of heat, ultraviolet-light, and atomic oxygen on composite materials. References References 1. Luoma G.A. and Rowland R.D. , Environmental...