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Sintering furnaces

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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 24 Continuous sintering furnace. Source: Ref 10 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... Abstract This chapter discusses the sintering process for stainless steel powders and its influence on corrosion resistance. It begins with a review of sintering furnaces and atmospheres and the effect of temperature and density on compact properties such as conductivity, ductility...
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 30 Photomicrograph of a sintered 316L part, taken near the exterior surface, showing a heavy network of chromium carbide precipitates in the grain boundaries. as well as within the grains, caused by contamination with carbonaceous deposits (lubricant residue) in the sintering furnace More
Image
Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.32 Optical micrograph showing extensive internal chromium nitrides that formed in the entire cross section of a wire sample obtained from a Type 314 wire mesh belt in a sintering furnace after service for 2 to 3 months at 1120 °C (2050 °F) in N 2 -10% H 2 . Courtesy of Haynes More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bpapp.t59290169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-319-5
... density ensures competitive properties. The peak temperature needed in sintering depends on the material. A small quantity of liquid between the particles accelerates sintering; thus, sintering often reaches the solidus temperature. Sintering furnaces come in many styles, sizes, and operating ranges, from...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000223
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... operating sintering furnace. required for initiating a chemical reaction or physical process such as diffusion or plastic aperture size. The opening of a mesh, as in a flow. sieve. activator. The additive used in activated sinter- apparent density. The weight of a unit volume ing, also called a dopant...
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 8.29 Front-loading batch furnace. The components for sintering are stacked on trays and loaded into the furnace. The typical cycle is 16 to 24 h, with a load of 100 to 250 kg (220 to 550 lb). More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mfub.t53740373
EISBN: 978-1-62708-308-9
... limit the oxygen content to that of the liquid melt prior to atomization. Water-atomized tool steels and stainless steels are examples where surface oxides (silicon oxides in stainless steels) are reduced during sintering at high temperatures in a low-dew-point furnace atmosphere (or by carbon in vacuum...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.isceg.t59320003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-332-4
..., and spread in layers over a moving conveyor or grate. The moving grate carries the mix into the sintering furnace. The coke burns, drawing combustion air through the mixture and forming a fused mix. The fused mix is cooled, crushed into lumps, and screened to form sintered charge. Sintering is a more...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... as within the grains, caused by contamination with carbonaceous deposits (lubricant residue) in the sintering furnace. Glyceregia etch Fig. 31 Photomicrograph of as-sintered 316L part, showing continuous network of chromium carbide precipitates along the grain boundaries. Glyceregia etch...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.9781627083126
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
Image
Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-115 Sintering pallet with grate bars for sintering ore and fluxes for the blast furnace. Width of pallet, 6 ft (1.8 m). The grate bars of heat resistant cast steel are cast separately. More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 10.7 Influence of added graphite on sintered carbon and oxygen contents for water-atomized 15 μm 17-4 PH stainless steel sintered in a graphite vacuum furnace at 1320 °C (2410 °F) for 60 min. Source: Chang et al. ( Ref 5 ) More
Image
Published: 01 October 2012
compaction and sintering in the final stages of pressing (right). (b) Hot isostatic pressing. In this process, the powder is simultaneously compacted and sintered to full density inside a pressure vessel within a resistance-heated furnace (left). The powder is placed in a container, which collapses when More
Image
Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.52 Auger composition-depth profile of 316L sintered in dissociated ammonia and slowly furnace cooled. Note chromium and nitrogen enrichment on surface. Source: Ref 28 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fahtsc.t51130395
EISBN: 978-1-62708-284-6
... sintered parts. For conventional sintering, which generally is conducted at 1120 °C, mesh belt conveyor furnaces are widely used. These furnaces can be used up to temperatures of 1150 °C, primarily due to the temperature limitation of the belt and metallic muffle material. For stainless steels...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
...-atomized grades of 304L and 316L that have nickel contents close to their upper ranges, that is, 13 and 14%, respectively, it is advisable to keep their carbon contents to ≤0.02%. While it is possible to achieve such low carbon contents with an induction furnace and typical commercial sintering...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... be obtained at low (1150 °C, or 2100 °F) sintering temperatures because of the lack of reduction of chromium oxides. It is possible to obtain good corrosion resistance of parts sintered in laboratory furnaces but not in industrial furnaces. Sintered stainless steel will always have inferior corrosion...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1988
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.eihdca.t65220001
EISBN: 978-1-62708-341-6
.... Initially, this was done using metal or electrically conducting crucibles. Later, Ferranti, Colby, and Kjellin developed induction melting furnaces which made use of nonconducting crucibles. In these designs, electric currents were induced directly into the charge, usually at simple line frequency, or 60 Hz...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pmsspmp.t52000039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-312-6
... time is found to increase shrinkage by a factor of √2 (or by approximately 40%). A high carbon potential of the sintering furnace and/or high carbon content of the part, resulting from inadequate delubrication, can affect the rate of sintering of ferritic grades of stainless steel. The high carbon...