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Rolling-contact wear

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610461
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... of the particular wear problem. Erosive Wear Erosive wear (or erosion) occurs when particles in a fluid or other carrier slide and roll at relatively high velocity against a surface. Each particle contacting the surface cuts a tiny particle from the surface. Individually, each particle removed...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.secwr.t68350043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-315-7
... encountered, that is, sliding, impact, and rolling contact ( Fig. 2 ). Budinski reduces wear processes into four categories, that is, abrasion, erosion, adhesion, and surface fatigue ( Fig. 3 ). Although both of the wear classifications schemes shown in Fig. 2 and 3 have merit, they also point out...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... Abstract This chapter covers common types of erosion, including droplet, slurry, cavitation, liquid impingement, gas flow, and solid particle erosion, and major types of wear, including abrasive, adhesive, lubricated, rolling, and impact wear. It also covers special cases such as galling...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... in ASM Handbook , Volume 18, Friction, Lubrication, and Wear Technology ( Ref 2 ) can be employed to calculate real areas of contact, but doing so quickly shows how surfaces deform under ball or line contacts so that even one portion of a ball contact in a ball bearing experiences pure rolling...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stmflw.9781627084598
EISBN: 978-1-62708-459-8
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stmflw.t59390039
EISBN: 978-1-62708-459-8
..., the characteristics of contact surfaces, and loading forces imposed by the process. It describes the nature of metal transfer between tool and workpiece surfaces and the role of lubricants, coatings, and textures. It also discusses the use of wear maps, the effects of adhesion, and material-lubricant interactions...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... of hardened steel gears, rolling-element bearings, roller cams, and other parts or assemblies where there is a combination of rolling and sliding motion. The parts subject to wear fatigue failure generally have two convex, or counterformal, surfaces in contact under load. Typical components...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stmflw.t59390173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-459-8
... the friction and wear that occur in hot and cold rolling under hydrodynamic and mixed-film lubrication; the influence of viscosity, film thickness, rolling speed, interface pressure, pass reduction, and lubricant breakdown; and the effect of surface finish and defects. The chapter also provides best practices...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... or device fail. Electronics manufacturers are doing their best to eliminate all tribosystems that involve materials in sliding contact. Switches used to have sliding members (a tribosystem) that was subject to the vicissitudes of friction and wear. Now, many switches work by infrared sensing or some...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 1985
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sagf.t63420085
EISBN: 978-1-62708-452-9
... Abstract This chapter presents a detailed discussion on the three most frequent gear failure modes. These include tooth bending fatigue, tooth bending impact, and abrasive tooth wear. Tooth bending fatigue includes surface contact fatigue (pitting), rolling contact fatigue, contact fatigue...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2023
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stmflw.t59390145
EISBN: 978-1-62708-459-8
... critical distinction between additives is possible, and tendencies for wear become more evident. (c) Velocity interacts with contact geometry, and speed can be intentionally changed: slowing down results in shifting toward the boundary regime, thus revealing additive effects and wear, whereas speeding...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... failure analysis. contact fatigue failure analysis fatigue failure gears macropitting micropitting rolling-contact fatigue scuffing spalling stress rupture subcase fatigue thermal fatigue wear GEARS can fail in many different ways, and except for an increase in noise level...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.9781627083232
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
Image
Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 2 Major categories of wear classified by the type of relative motion encountered (sliding, impact, and rolling contact). Using this classification system, galling, scuffing, and scoring are not strictly considered forms of wear because material is not necessarily removed (it may instead More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mnm2.t53060385
EISBN: 978-1-62708-261-7
... between applied stresses and crack propagation in the part (see references for more detail). 16.1 The Many Faces of Wear Wear is mechanically induced surface damage that results in the progressive removal of material due to the relative motion between the subject surface and a contacting medium...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... transmission fluid. Bulk temperature, 90 °C (194 °F). Filter, 10 mm (nominal). Test speed, 1330 rpm. Phasing gear set, 16 tooth/56 tooth. Slide/roll ratio, 43%. Contact stress, 400 ksi. Load, 3000 lb. Test No. Specimen No. Test duration R a (a) λ (b) Wear (c) , in. Wear rate (d) Comments...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250019
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... and units of measure used in this chapter to discuss friction, lubrication, and wear of gears Table 1 Nomenclature and units of measure used in this chapter to discuss friction, lubrication, and wear of gears Symbol Description Units B M Thermal contact coefficient lbf/(in. · s 0.5...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... on the rolling elements. The term false Brinelling is sometimes used to describe the indentations. However, the mechanism of failure actually is fretting wear. Fretting also is a serious problem on parts such as shafts, where it can initiate fatigue cracking on the contacting surfaces. In fact, many fatigue...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 April 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpsfwea.t59300047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-323-2
... would be rubbing all the time and they would fail from wear or rolling contact fatigue (pits and spalling in the balls and raceways). The life of the bearing would be only a fraction of the life lubricated. When properly lubricated and at the proper speed, the rollers and raceways do not touch...
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 Waves of detachment when an elastomer is slid against a hard and smooth surface. The rubber moves forward in the form of ripples of wave on its contact surface with a smooth and hard counterface. These so-called waves of detachment can produce wear in the form of rolls of detached More