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Rockwell hardness

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.phtpclas.t64560437
EISBN: 978-1-62708-353-9
... Abstract This appendix lists approximate equivalent hardness numbers and tensile strengths for Rockwell C and B hardness numbers for steel. equivalent hardness numbers Rockwell hardness steel tensile strength This appendix is a reprint of tables giving approximate equivalent...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.6 Rockwell hardness indentations. (a) Minor load. (b) Major load More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 9.10 Rockwell hardness of fresh (untempered) martensite More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.13 Rockwell hardness of fresh martensite as a function of carbon content More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.1 Rockwell hardness versus radius for 25 mm (1 in.) diameter bars of oil-quenched 1060 and 5160 steels More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 20 Rockwell hardness of engineering plastics. PET, polyethylene terephthalate; PA, polyamide; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; ABS, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 7 Principal components of a regular or normal Rockwell hardness tester. Superficial Rockwell testers are similarly constructed. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 9 Typical anvils for Rockwell hardness testing. (a) Standard spot, flat, and V anvils. (b) Testing table for large workpieces. (c) Cylinder anvil. (d) Diamond spot anvil. (e) Eyeball anvil. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-12 Percentage decrease in Rockwell hardness due to specimen tilting as a function of tilt angle and hardness. (From Bastin and Mulhearn, Ref. 23, courtesy of The Metals Society.) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.5 Approximation of compressive yield strength using Rockwell hardness. Source: Ref 16.29 – 16.32 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.7 Effect of tempering temperature on Rockwell hardness and toughness as determined by Charpy test. Source: Ref 16.34 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 23 Example of a Rockwell hardness testing machine. Courtesy of EMCO More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 10.23 Hardness (Rockwell C) versus carbon content for quenched steels. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.6 Dependence of Rockwell C hardness on blade thickness. G.S., grain size More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.9 Rockwell C hardness decreases with increasing reduction in area (ductility) for 1060 and 5160 steels after tempering for 1 h at temperatures shown. The dashed vertical line compares alloying effects at constant ductility. The dashed horizontal line compares alloying effects More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.11 Predicted Rockwell C hardness versus tempering temperature for 1045 steel More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 6.7 A high-speed steel tempering curve showing the hardness peak at Rockwell 65. More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 5-10 Model 3-DT Rockwell standard and superficial hardness tester with digital readout. (Courtesy of Page-Wilson Corp., Measurement Systems Div.) More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 16.4 Conversion of Rockwell and Vickers hardness values, based on curve fitting. Source: Ref 16.29 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3 Hardness measurement according to Rockwell, schematical view. Source: Ref 1 More