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Retained austenite

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... Abstract This chapter addresses the issue of retained austenite in quenched carburized steels. It explains why retained austenite can be expected at the surface of case-hardened components, how to estimate the amount that will be present, and how to effectively stabilize or otherwise control...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.8 Retained austenite as a function of carbon content in Fe-C alloys. Source: Ref 5.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.19 Plate martensite and retained austenite (white patches) in (a) Fe-1.22C and (b) Fe-1.4C alloys. Light micrographs. Source: Ref 5.10 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 5.33 Interlath retained austenite, the thin linear features, in a steel containing 0.06 wt% carbon. Dark-field transmisson electron micrograph. Courtesy of Professor Steven Thompson, Colorado School of Mines More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.8 Retained austenite (gray, marked with A) between ferrite laths of upper bainite in 0.6% carbon steel containing 2.0% Si and transformed at 400 °C (750 °F). Transmission electron micrograph, original magnification 40,000×. Source: Ref 6.12 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 7.38 A plot showing the percent of retained austenite in specimens of a dual-phase steel sheet prepared with new and worn grinding papers (two specimens each). The true amount of retained austenite is 8.5% as seen in the two bars on the right for chemically polished specimens (no grinding More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.24 Retained austenite as a function of transformation temperature and time in microstructures produced by isothermal holding of a 0.14% C-1.21% Si-1.57% Mn steel intercritically annealed at 770 °C (1420 °F). Source: Ref 12.61 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 12.27 Changes in retained austenite content, measured after tensile testing at room temperature, as a function of strain in intercritically annealed 0.14% C-Si-Mn steel isothermally transformed at 350 °C (660 °F) for 4 min, Aa; 350 °C (660 °F) for 15 min, Ab; 400 °C (750 °F) for 4 min, Ac More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.16 Transformation of retained austenite in an Fe-1.22C alloy as a function of time at three tempering temperatures. Source: Ref 17.29 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 17.17 Retained austenite and cementite as a function of tempering temperature in 4340 and 4130 type steels. The amounts of the phases were determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Source: Ref 17.30 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 18.13 (a) Interlath retained austenite (white diagonal bands) and transition carbides in 4130 steel tempered at 150 °C (300 °F). (b) Dense transition carbide precipitation in a martensite lath in 4150 steel tempered at 150 °C. Dark-field transmission electron micrographs. Courtesy More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.30 Strain-induced transformation of retained austenite to martensite as a function of strain. As-quenched tempered martensite is dark, retained austenite is white, and strain-induced martensite is orange. Sodium metabisulfite etch, 1000×, light micrographs. Courtesy of Marc Zaccone More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.32 Retained austenite as a function of distance from the surface of carburized 4320 steel in as-carburized sample and after various types of shot peening. Source: Ref 21.55 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.35 Fatigue limits as a function of retained austenite in 8719 steel carburized and hardened as marked. Source: Ref 21.57 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 24.14 Hardness and retained austenite as a function of tempering temperature for A-2 tool steel. Source: Ref 24.39 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 24.15 Hardness and retained austenite as a function of tempering temperature for H-13 tool steel. Source: Ref 24.39 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.11 Martensite microstructure (needle-shaped grains) and retained austenite (white matrix). Source: Ref 2.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.19 (a) Martensite plates in a retained austenite matrix in a steel containing 1.7% C, rapidly cooled to room temperature. (b) The same sample subjected to cooling in liquid air. Martensite volume fraction has increased significantly and retained austenite has been almost completely More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 Retained austenite in two cold work tool steels after hardening and tempering. (a) D2, with 60 HRC. (b) O1, with 54 HRC. For both, the retained austenite content is higher than expected (due to overheating in the hardening treatment). (c) O1 punch from which the microstructure in (b More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 20 Hardness and retained austenite as a function of tempering in A2 tool steel. Source: Ref 18 More