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Residues

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Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630035
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
...Abstract Abstract Residual, or locked-in internal, stresses are regions of misfit within a metal part or assembly that can cause distortion and fracture just as can the more obvious applied, or service, stresses. This chapter describes the fundamental facts about residual stresses and discusses...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410487
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Temperature and deformation gradients developed in the course of manufacturing can have undesired effects on the microstructures along their path; the two most common being residual stress and distortion. This chapter discusses these manufacturing-related problems and how they can be minimized...
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 5.37 Effects of surface residual stress on fatigue strength. Source: Ref 5.17 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.20 Residual stress state around cold-worked hole. Source: Ref 8.7 , Courtesy Fatigue Technology, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 21 Residual stress patterns produced by rolling. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 5 Residual stress from surface grinding of D6AC steel (56 HRC). Source: Ref 5 Wheel A46K8V Wheel speed, m/min (ft/min) 1800 (6000) Cross feed, mm/pass (in.pass) 1.25 (0.050) Table speed, m/min (ft/min) 12 (40) Depth of grind, mm (in.) 0.25 (0.010) Grinding fluid More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 3 Effect of residual carbon content on compressibility and green strength of water-atomized high-carbon iron. Pressed at 550 MPa (40 tsi) with 1% zinc stearate admixed. Symbols represent experimental data points. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 1.19 Residual stresses at the base of the teeth in carburized and carbonitrided gears. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 1.20 Residual stress profiles for both 4615 and 8620 materials. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 2.15 Effect of decarburization on the residual stresses developed in carburized and hardened plates. The carbon content at 0.002 mm was estimated to be 1% (curve 1), 0.64% (curve 2), and 0.35% (curve 3). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.17 Variation of fatigue-crack initiation lives with residual stress at the notch of tested steels. Surface carbon: 0.95 to 1.05%. Hardness 750 to 780 HV. Crack initiation, 5 μm crack at the notch. Source: Ref 25 Steel Carbides Retained austenite Vol% Diameter, μm Spacing More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.26 The loss of surface compressive residual stresses due to the presence of a highly developed carbide zone in 20KhNV4MF steel. Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4.13 Retained austenite and residual stress distributions in case-hardened test pieces. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 4.14 Residual stress distributions in two oil-hardened carburized gears. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.14 Dependence of residual stress in carburized and hardened cases on core carbon level. (a) Residual stress distribution in samples of Cr-Mn-Ti steel of varying core carbon contents; case depth, 1.2 mm; quenched from 810 °C. (b) Relationship between surface residual stress and core carbon More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.15 Relationship between fatigue limit and surface residual stress for the Cr-Mn-Ti steel referred to in Fig. 6.14 . Generally (a) A reduction in surface compressive stresses leads to (b) A reduction in bending fatigue resistance. Source: Ref 13 , 15 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.34 Effect of case depth on residual stress. Influence of internal oxidation at the surface of the deep-case test piece is also indicated. Source: Ref 40 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.35 Effect of case depth on residual stress. Effect of carbon potential is also indicated. Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 6.36 Effect of fatigue stressing on the tangential residual stresses in 18 mm diam case-hardened fatigue test pieces. Source: Ref 40 More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 7.11 Residual stresses (tangential) in cyanide-hardened 40Kh rings before and after tempering (for 1.5 h). Ring dimensions: 80 mm outside diam × 66 mm inside diam × 15 mm high. Case depth 0.22 mm (on outside diam only). Source: Ref 22 More