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Residual stresses

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410487
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Temperature and deformation gradients developed in the course of manufacturing can have undesired effects on the microstructures along their path; the two most common being residual stress and distortion. This chapter discusses these manufacturing-related problems and how they can be minimized...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630035
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract Residual, or locked-in internal, stresses are regions of misfit within a metal part or assembly that can cause distortion and fracture just as can the more obvious applied, or service, stresses. This chapter describes the fundamental facts about residual stresses and discusses...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tstap.t56040084
EISBN: 978-1-62708-428-4
... Abstract This article, prepared under the auspices of the ASM Thermal Spray Society Committees on Accepted Practices, describes a procedure for evaluating residual stresses in thermal spray coatings, which is an extension of the well-known layer removal method to include the Young’s modulus...
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-30. Residual stresses in a shaft due to plastic bending during a straightening operation. (a) Stress distribution during plastic bending. (b) Residual stress measured after load removal. 9 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 96 Stress profile in a round bar in the loaded state, where residual stresses after induction surface hardening and loading stresses add up. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 97 Stress profile in a round bar in the loaded state, where residual stresses after carburizing or nitriding and loading stresses add up. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 24 Range of residual stresses obtained for 70 carburized steels More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 54 Effect of decarburization on the residual stresses of carburized and hardened 3.5Ni-1.5Cr steel. The carbon content at 0.002 mm was approximately 1% for curve 1, 0.64% for curve 2, and 0.35% for curve 3. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 8 Distributions of fatigue limit, curves 1 and 2; residual stresses, curve 3 (550 °C) and curve 4 (620 °C); extraneous loading, curves 5 and 6, 40HM (4140)-grade steel More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 2 Thermal residual stresses. (a) Unrestrained expansion and contraction. (b) Restrained expansion, unrestrained contraction. (c) Restrained expansion and contraction. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 3 Deformation caused by thermal residual stresses. (a) Flat, platelike metal at uniform temperature. (b) Lateral expansion of upper part on heating is restrained by cold, strong metal below, causing compressive stress (C) on upper (convex) and lower (concave) surfaces and tensile stress More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 4 Thermal residual stresses caused by spot heating. (a) Stress-free plate or sheet at uniform temperature. (b) When locally through-heated, plate expands laterally, generating compressive stresses; also bulges in thickness direction. (c) When cooled to original temperature, plate More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 7 Demonstration of the principle of mechanically induced residual stresses. (a) A hard ball pressed into a metal surface at point of greatest penetration. Note that the original surface (dashed line) is stretched (tension) into a spherical shape by the force on the ball. Radial reaction More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 8.7 Comparison of residual stresses in a thick, constant cross-section 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate before and after stress relief. (a) High residual stresses in the solution-treated and quenched alloy. (b) Reduction in stresses after stretching 2%. Source: Ref 8.18 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 15.4 Peak axial residual stresses on the inside surface of welded type 304 stainless steel pipes. Source: Ref 15.4 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 15.5 Through-wall distribution of weld residual stresses in a 660 mm (26 in.) diam type 304 stainless steel pipe. Source: Ref 15.7 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 15.7 Through-wall axial residual stresses for last-pass heat-sink welding (LPHSW) of a 610 mm (24 in.) diam type 304 stainless steel pipe. Source: Ref 15.12 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 15.8 Through-wall axial residual stresses in induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) treated and nontreated 410 mm (16 in.) diam type 304 stainless steel pipe weldments. Source: Ref 15.13 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 17.22 Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens containing residual stresses from plastic deformation. (a) Cracked cup specimen (Ericksen impression). Source: Ref 17.4 . (b) Joggled extrusion containing SCC in the plastically deformed region. Source: Ref 17.9 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 17.23 Stress-corrosion cracking test specimens containing residual stresses from plastic deformation. Shown are 12.7 mm (0.5 in.) diameter stainless tubular specimens after SCC testing. (a) and (b) Annealed tubing that was cold formed before testing. (c) Cold worked tubing tested More