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Replicas

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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 9.5 Electron micrograph of a surface replica showing fine, parallel striations (region A) on a transgranular SCC fracture. Source: Ref 9.57 More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.11 A transmission electron micrograph of a two-stage, shadowed surface replica of AISA/SAE 1080 pearlitic steel showing a boundary between two pearlite colonies. Specimen etched for 10 s in 2% nital followed by 20 s in 4% picral. 4,000× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.15 Example of a carbon surface replica of a bainitic steel shadowed with carbon. 5000× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.16 An extraction replica showing titanium-molybdenum carbides in a high-strength, low-alloy steel. 130,000× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.28 A STEM micrograph of titanium-molybdenum carbides in an extraction replica of a HSLA steel. Micrograph taken in dark field, thus the precipitates appear white in a dark matrix. 230,000×. Courtesy of K.A. Taylor, Bethlehem Steel Corporation More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.53 (a) Replica, produced with transparent adhesive tape of the magnetic particle (MT) examination of the weld edges of a plate of structural steel WStE355. The plate is 38 mm (1.5 in.) thick. The indications are elongated in the direction of rolling. (b) Micrograph of the region More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 12.10 Grain-boundary films of MC (black) in Waspaloy (extraction replica—black objects were standing vertically in grain boundary prior to extraction). Waspaloy was intentionally forged under poor conditions to cause grain-boundary films. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10.8 Scanning electron microscopy studies of fatigue-fracture surface by replication. Material: 7075-T6 aluminum alloy; fatigue life, 56,000 cycles. Source: Ref 10.31 More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 4-36 Example of an optical replica of ferrite and pearlite in AISI 1040 using the Struers Transcopy replication tape. The sample was etched in 4% picral, 150×. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9.14 (a) The electron micrograph image of Fe-C pearlite replica. (b) Comparison of λ and v of Fe-C pearlite and ordinary eutectic or eutectoid More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 4.2 Selected morphologies of the γ′ phase. (a) B-1900 nickel-base alloy, as cast. Light-etching carbide particles are dispersed and at grain boundaries. The fine constituent within grains is γ′. (b) B-1900 nickel-base alloy, as cast. Replica electron micrograph showing large metal carbide More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 5.15 Three steps of the replication process. (a) Part is ground, polished, and etched in the region of interest, and the material for producing the replica is prepared. (b) Replica material is carefully pressed over the region to replicate—and kept in place, without movement More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.33 Cleavage fracture in a low-carbon martensitic steel. (a) Light microscope cross section with nickel plating at top showing the fracture profile. (b) Direct light photograph. (c) Direct SEM fractograph. (d) Light fractograph of replica. (e) SEM fractograph of replica. (f) TEM More
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Published: 01 August 1999
. 470 HV. Arrows indicate typical carbide particles. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replica. 1% nital + picral. 10,000×. (d) Austenitized at 850 °C, water quenched, tempered at 500 °C for 30 min. 360 HV. Arrows indicate typical carbide particles. Electron micrograph of a platinum More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 7.3 Ferrite grain-boundary allotriomorphs, Widmanstätten side plates, and martensite in a quenched Fe-0.2%C alloy. Ferrite allotriomorphs A and B have orientations that favor Widmanstätten growth into different austenite grains, as described in the text. Replica electron micrograph from More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.6 (Part 2) (g) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 300 °C for 200 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replica of the specimen shown in (e). Picral. 5000×. (h) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 300 °C for 2000 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 9.4 (Part 2) (e) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 450 °C for 0.5 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replicas. Picral. 5000×. (f) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 450 °C for 30 s. 415 HV. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replicas. Picral More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 10.2 (Part 2) (e) Austenitized at 850 °C, water quenched, tempered at 600 °C for 30 min. 305 HV. Arrows indicate typical carbide particles. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replica. 1% nital + picral. 10,000×. (f) Austenitized at 850 °C, water quenched, tempered More
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Published: 01 August 1999
. 2000×. (c) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 450 °C for 30 s. 415 HV. Picral. 250×. (d) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 450 °C for 30 s. Picral. 2000×. (e) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 450 °C for 0.5 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replicas. Picral. 5000 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
s. 590 HV. Picral. 2000×. (g) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 300 °C for 200 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed carbon replica of the specimen shown in (e). Picral. 5000×. (h) Austenitized at 860 °C, transformed at 300 °C for 2000 s. Electron micrograph of a platinum-shadowed More