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Quenching cracks

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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 18 AISI O1 tool steel that cracked during oil quenching. Note the cracks emanating from the sharp corners. The four holes, which are close to the edge, also contribute to cracking. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 16 Examples of quench cracks. (a) Micrograph of AISI 4340 quenched and tempered steel illustrating a macroetched pure quench crack. (b) Micrograph of AISI 4142 steel as-quenched and tempered. The microstructure is tempered martensite with quench cracking at the fillet radius. Original More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.59 Quenching crack susceptibility as a function of the “equivalent carbon” used as a measure for hardenability. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.62 Quench crack in prior austenitic grain boundaries. During heating for quenching there was excessive austenitic grain growth. Etchant: nital 2%. Courtesy of M.M. Souza, Neumayer-Tekfor, Jundiaí, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.8 Quench cracks in axle shaft flange radius. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.9 Quench crack in induction-hardened shoulder. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.10 Quench crack at spline end of axle shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.11 Quench crack in machined groove on a shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.12 Quench cracks on spline surface. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.13 Quench cracks in machined hole on a shaft. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 21 Quench cracks due to excessively large grain boundaries resulting from excessively high austenitizing temperature. Note cracking patterns associated with prior coarse austenite grain boundaries. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 25 Quench crack promoted by the presence of a deep, sharp stamp mark in a die made of AISI S7 tool steel. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 26 A 4140 grade steel seamless tubing that failed because of quench cracks. (a) Cross section of tube showing extensive cracking revealed by dye-penetrant inspection. (b) SEM micrograph showing intergranular fracture at a crack origin. Original magnification: 90×. (c) SEM micrograph More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 35 Schematic of quench crack formation. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.5 Impingement of martensite plates leading to quench cracks (QC) More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 24 Quench crack with typical geometry More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 7 Relationship between quench cracking frequency and martensite start (M s ) temperature. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 8 Relationship between quench cracking frequency and austenitic grain size. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Relationship between carbon equivalent (C eq ) and quench cracking frequency. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 20 Design solutions to the quench-cracking problem often encountered in shaft hardening over a cross hole. Source: Ref 19 More