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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.emea.t52240135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-251-8
... Abstract Precipitation hardening is used extensively to strengthen aluminum alloys, magnesium alloys, nickel-base superalloys, beryllium-copper alloys, and precipitation-hardening stainless steels. This chapter discusses two types of particle strengthening: precipitation hardening, which takes...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the composition, alloying characteristics, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, advantages, limitations, and applications of martensitic, semiaustenitic, and austenitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steels. mechanical properties corrosion...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pdub.t53420339
EISBN: 978-1-62708-310-2
... Abstract This chapter discusses the basic principles of precipitation hardening, an important strengthening mechanism in nonferrous alloys as well as stainless steel. It begins with a detailed review of the theory of precipitation hardening, then describes its application to aluminum alloys...
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 3.8 Various stages of precipitation in HT aluminum alloys; (a) and (b) clusters or G-P zones coherent with the aluminum lattice; (c) partially coherent phases, such as θ or β, which are responsible for strength in the T6 or T8 tempers; (d) equilibrium precipitate (θ or β, etc.) formed More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.26 Isothermal transformation curve for the precipitation in W. Nr. 1.4462 (2505/UNS S31803) steel after annealing at 1050 °C (1920 °F). The curves indicate the time required, at each temperature, for the start of the precipitation of the phase indicated (carbides, sigma, chi, or α More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.41 ASTM A564 UNS 17400, SAE/AISI 630 (17-4PH) precipitation hardening stainless steel. (a) Solubilized at 1040 °C (1905 °F) for 1 h followed by water quenching. Low carbon martensite (maximum specified carbon content is 0.07%). (b) Solubilized and aged at 590 °C (1095 °F) for 4 h, air More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.43 Schematic presentation of the precipitation of chromium carbide causing sensitization and decreasing the corrosion resistance of the grain boundary region. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 3 Precipitation on the fracture surface of a specimen which served as the source of the fatigue fracture. Original magnification: 500× More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 25.16 Precipitation hardening of high-strength beryllium-copper alloys More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 29.5 Precipitation heat treated Duranickel 301. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 29.7 Typical mechanical properties of precipitation-hardened Monel K-500. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 30.5 Microstructure of a precipitation-strengthened nickel-base superalloy. Original magnification: 6000×. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.34 Schematic of precipitation hardening process More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 6 Precipitation-hardening curves of beryllium-copper binary alloys. As the percentage of beryllium increases, the aging time required to reach maximum hardness is shortened, and the maximum hardness is increased. These alloys were quenched form 800 °C (1470 °F) and aged at 350 °C (660 °F More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.12 (a) Colonies of interphase precipitation (light areas) nucleated at austenite grain boundaries of an Fe-0.75V-0.15C alloy held 10 s at 680 °C (1255 °F). Original magnification at 125×. (b) Rows of fine alloy carbides within a colony of the same steel held 5 min at 725 °C (1340 °F More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 4.13 Interphase precipitation and ledges in Fe-12Cr-0.2C steel isothermally transformed at 650 °C (1200 °F) for 36 min. Transmission electron micrograph. Original magnification about 70,000×. Courtesy of K. Campbell and R.W.K. Honeycombe, University of Cambridge, U.K. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.42 Lath martensite in a precipitation-hardening stainless steel (Custom 630). Kalling’s reagent #2. 200× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.43 Lath martensite in a precipitation-hardening stainless steel (Custom 630). Fry’s reagent. 250× More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 16.30 Ranges of boron segregation and M 23 (B,C) 6 precipitation as a function of quenching temperature and the product of B and C concentrations. Source: Ref 16.41 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.12 Chromium carbide precipitation on various types of boundaries in type 304 stainless steel. Arrows in upper left point to large carbides on a high-angle grain boundary, and IT and CT refer to incoherent and coherent twin boundaries, respectively. Transmission electron micrograph More