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Polyvinyl chloride

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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 33 Thermogravimetric analysis of polyvinyl chloride, 21.41 mg (0.33 gr), 20 °C/min (36 °F/min), to 950 °C (1740 °F), in nitrogen More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Fatigue failure of a nonconductive polyvinyl chloride pipe imaged in the uncoated state using a low-pressure microscope. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 Isometric tensile creep curves for unplasticized polyvinyl chloride at 20 °C (68 °F), 50% relative humidity More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 31 Fracture in a polyvinyl chloride water filter. The fracture surface of the fatigue crack started from a fissure (arrow F). The lower dark zone is an artifact due to sectioning of the filter wall. 75× More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.12 Young’s modulus of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is approximately three orders of magnitude below the glass transition temperature rather than above it. It depends only slightly on the rate of loading. Source: Ref 9.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 14 G ′ of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blends; MW A = 58 × 10 4 ; MW B = 5.9 × 10 4 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 15 Development of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) master curve More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Polyvinyl chloride quenched from 90 to 40 °C (195 to 105 °F). Accurate to ±2%. Source: Ref 37 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sfa.t52780131
EISBN: 978-1-62708-268-6
... Abstract Leaks can occur as the result of several failure causes. This chapter reviews the causes, features, and impact of various types of leaks, namely gasket leaks, O-ring leaks, bond-joint leaks, weld leaks, polyvinyl chloride leaks, valve leaks, and structural leaks. bond-joint leaks...
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Published: 01 December 2003
; PS, polystyrene; PVC; polyvinyl chloride; PSF, polysulfone. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 34 Thermogravimetric analysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of polyvinyl chloride More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 11 Impact strength as a function of the radius of the tip of the notch for different polymers. PVC, polyvinyl chloride; ABS, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 26 Thermomechanical analysis properties of commercial polymers. PSU, polysulfone; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 22 The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum obtained on the failed tubing material. The spectrum exhibits absorption bands indicative of a polyvinyl chloride resin containing an adipate-based plasticizer. More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 9 Fatigue crack propagation behavior of various polymers. PSU, polysulfone; PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate; PC, polycarbonate; PS, polystyrene; PVC, polyvinyl chloride. Source: Ref 48 More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.7 Two-body abrasion test results of selected plastics. UHMWPE, ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene; PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; CE, canvas electrical grade; PMMA, polymethyl methacrylate; PI, polyimide More
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Published: 30 April 2021
Fig. 11.17 Results of reciprocating ball-on-flat wear test (ASTM International G133, procedure A; 60 HRC 52100 steel ball) versus various plastics at room temperature. UHMWPE, ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene; PVC, polyvinyl chloride More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 33 Scanning electron microscope fractographs of discontinuous growth bands in (a) polyvinyl chloride, (b) polystyrene, (c) polysulfone, (d) polycarbonate, (e) polyamide, and (f) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene. Arrows indicate crack growth direction. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 34 Discontinuous crack growth process. (a) Composite micrograph of polyvinyl chloride showing positions of crack tip (arrows on the left) and craze tip (arrows on the right) at given cyclic intervals. (b) Model of discontinuous cracking process. Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 A 1000 h creep modulus of several polymers as a function of temperature. PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; PP, polypropylene; HDPE, high-density polyethylene; T g , glass transition temperature More