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Polycarbonate

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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Polycarbonate creep compliance at 23 °C (73.4 °F) and 60 °C (140 °F) with Arrhenius plot of shift factor. a T , amount of curve shift. Source: Ref 22 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Photo-Fries reaction in aromatic polycarbonate; h , Planck’s constant; ν, photon frequency More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Craze formation in a polycarbonate polymer in tension under alcohol. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 Isochronous plot of polycarbonate stress-strain behavior as a function of temperature. Note that the crazing locus decreases in strain value with increasing temperature. (a) 23 °C (73.5 °F). Relative humidity, 50%. (b) 40 °C (104 °F). (c) 80 °C (176 °F). (d) 100 °C (212 °F). Courtesy More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 9 Failed polycarbonate lenses exhibited primary and secondary cracking associated with solvent swelling and cracking More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 16 Shrinkage void on field fracture surface of polycarbonate. 12× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 17 Polycarbonate fracture surface showing mirror zone, mist and hackle regions, and Wallner lines. 14× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 18 Fracture initiation region of polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact showing mirror zone and mist region. 27× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 20 Hackle region in final ligament of polycarbonate specimen after Izod impact. 14× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 23 Fatigue striations on the fracture surface of a polycarbonate plumbing fixture after field failure. 32× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 28 Features observed on fatigue area of polycarbonate rotating beam specimen. (a) Optical view at base of notch. (b) Higher-magnification electron fractograph. Sample was sputter coated with platinum for SEM examination. More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Fracture map for polycarbonate More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 10 S - N data compared to crack-growth prediction. (a) Polycarbonate (PC); a i = 0.013 mm (0.5 mil). (b) Modified polyphenylene ether (M-PPE); a i = 0.32 mm (12.5 mil). (c) Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS); a i = 0.23 mm (9 mil) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 19 Gating variations. ABS, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene; PC, polycarbonate; M-PPO, modified polyphenylene oxide More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 1 Activation spectra of 760 μm (30 mil) polycarbonate source using 6000 W xenon weatherometer with borosilicate filters plus short-wavelength cutoff filters. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 Stress-strain curves for rubber-modified polycarbonate at room temperature as a function of strain rate More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 Hysteresis loops for several loading-unloading cycles for a polycarbonate/polybutylene terephthalate blend. D , specimen displacement; HR, ratio of hysteresis energy to total strain energy. Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 1 Stress-strain behavior of polycarbonate as a function of strain rate, λ ˙ , at 22.2 °C (72 °F). (Note: For small strains, extension, e , is approximately equal to engineering strain, ε.) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Strain-rate and temperature dependence of yield stress for polycarbonate More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Impact test of a polycarbonate box section More