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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 3.12 General arrangement for upset welding of bars, rods, and pipes. Source: Ref 3.5 , p 598 More
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Published: 01 September 2011
Fig. 2.25 Pipes, joints, reducers, elbows, and T-shaped parts used in the oil and chemical industry More
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Published: 01 September 2011
Fig. 7.25 Use of short- and ultrashort-radius composite drill pipes in drilling horizontally into an oil-and/or gas-bearing strata. A, horizontal well; B, vertical well. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas More
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Published: 01 September 2011
Fig. 7.26 The short- and ultrashort-radius composite drill pipes exhibit little to no signs of wear after 160,000 cycles. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.3(a) Coil efficiency for induction heating of pipes as a function of wall thickness and outer diameter using power-supply frequencies of (a) 60. From Brochure SA9906, Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.3(b) Coil efficiency for induction heating of pipes as a function of wall thickness and outer diameter using power-supply frequencies of (b) 180. From Brochure SA9906, Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.3(c) Coil efficiency for induction heating of pipes as a function of wall thickness and outer diameter using power-supply frequencies of (c) 960 Hz. From Brochure SA9906, Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 1 Localized corrosion of stainless steel pipes from direct exposure to marine mists, compounded by plastic wraps More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 10 Time-to-failure of high-density polyethylene pipes at different stresses and temperatures. Source: Ref 11 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220475
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the properties and compositions of steels used in pressure vessels, piping, boilers, rebar, and other structural applications. It covers fine-grained steels, quenched and tempered steels, and controlled rolled (thermomechanical treatment) steels. It also compares...
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.45 Macrographs showing examples of residual pipe and/or secondary pipe in hot formed bars produced from conventional ingots. No etching. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 3 Overview of pipe section. Cracking is visible on right end of the pipe at the toe of the weld. Courtesy of MEICharlton, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 8 Stainless steel piping such as small-bore piping is designed to leak before break. A fatigue crack either initiates at the toe or the root of the weld. (a) Typical socket fitting with a fillet weld. (b) Micrograph of a cross section through a socket-welded joint showing fatigue crack More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 16 Comparison of last-pass heat sink welding pipe tests with reference pipe tests More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.28 Effect of a crack on the pattern of eddy-current flow in a pipe More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.4 Erosion pitting caused by turbulent river water flowing through copper pipe. The typical horseshoe-shaped pits point upstream. Original magnification: 0.5×. Source: Ref 16.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.5 Pipe or shrinkage cavity in the top of an ingot. Longitudinal section. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.6 Pipe in a small ingot. Etched. A hot crack starting at the bottom of the pipe and propagating between two grains can be seen. Copyright © Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. Reprinted with permission. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.17 (a) Cross section of rolled structural profiles with “residual pipe” (the bottom of the pipe—solidification contraction—in the conventional ingot was not completely eliminated from the rolled product). No etching. (b) Cross section of a structural profile rolled from iron obtained More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.11 Dual-phase API X100 steel for piping produced through controlled rolling. C = 0.06%, Mn = 1.96%, Nb = 0.04%, Ti = 0.01%, + Ni, Cu, Mo. Granular ferrite and bainite (martensite and retained austenite are also present). Courtesy of Nippon Steel Corporation. Source: Ref 11 More