1-20 of 256 Search Results for

Nonmetallic inclusions

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220129
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
.... continuous casting hot cracking ingot casting macrosegregation microporosity nonmetallic inclusions solidification shrinkage steel Modern steelmaking and refining processes are capable of producing large masses of highly homogeneous steel, both chemically and thermally. However, these liquid...
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 4.7 Micrograph of nonmetallic inclusions in typical, commercially pure aluminum. Original magnification: 500×. (a) Annealed structure. (b) Cold worked structure More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.25 Growth of bainite plates from intragranular nonmetallic inclusions in a steel containing C = 0.38%, Mn = 1.39%, S = 0.039%, V = 0.09%, N = 130 ppm isothermally treated for 38 s at 450 °C (842 °F). Arrow indicates bainite plates with carbides in between the plates as well as inside More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.20 The effect of the relative plasticity of nonmetallic inclusions on their deformation with respect to the steel. Plastic inclusions will elongate as a result of hot working. Hard inclusions may remain unchanged or break and redistribute in the product. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.21 Gray cast iron with large graphite flakes. Nonmetallic inclusions can also be observed. Not etched. More
Image
Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.12 (Part 1) Deformation effects in cementite particles and nonmetallic inclusions. Tensile stress axis is horizontal. (a) and (b) 0.4% C, spheroidized (0.40C-0.24Si-0.64Mn, wt%). Necked region of tensile testpiece. (a) 2% nital. 2000×. (b) Scanning electron micrograph. 2% nital More
Image
Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.34(b) Nonmetallic inclusions and banding in a heavily microsegregated 1% C alloy steel sample. Retained austenite, light More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.71 A large oxide nonmetallic inclusion in a cast steel, quenched and tempered. Clearly the reaction between the inclusion and the steel has been stopped by the end of the part solidification. There is a “crown” of small oxide particles around the inclusion. This probably results from More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 8.76 (a) Sulfide nonmetallic inclusion in as-cast steel. SEM, BE. No etching (b) EDS spectrum of the inclusion. Quantitative analysis calculated from EDS results. Manganese sulfide. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.80 Widmanstätten ferrite plates nucleated in a nonmetallic inclusion in a low-carbon steel. The variety of orientations of the plates indicates that the nucleation mechanism does not involve epitaxy. Courtesy of G. Thewlis. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.32 Shape of different types of nonmetallic inclusion produced in stainless steels to improve machinability. Steel has been hot worked and heat treated. (a) Cr = 13%, Si = 1%, Al = 0.3% + Ti, C, S; (b) Cr = 13%, Si = 1%, Al = 0.3% + Pb; and (c) Cr = 18%, Si = 1%, Mo = 0.5%, S = 0.3 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.22 An EDS spectrum of the elements contained in the nonmetallic inclusion in Fig. 6.19 . The inclusion contains calcium, aluminum, and sulfur, with traces of silicon, potassium, and manganese (the iron peak is from the surrounding steel). The vertical axis (intensity) has a full scale More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 18 Effect of nonmetallic inclusion size on fatigue. Steels were two lots of AISI-SAE 4340H; one lot (lower curve) contained abnormally large inclusions; the other lot (upper curve) contained small inclusions. Source: Ref 8 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 5.46 White etching “butterfly,” developed at a nonmetallic inclusion as a result of contact loading. 750× More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... Abstract Porosity in aluminum is caused by the precipitation of hydrogen from liquid solution or by shrinkage during solidification, and more usually by a combination of these effects. Nonmetallic inclusions entrained before solidification influence porosity formation and mechanical properties...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.msisep.t59220353
EISBN: 978-1-62708-259-4
.... It describes the effect of hot working on nonmetallic inclusions and the many properties influenced by them. It discusses the recrystallization mechanism by which hot working produces microstructural changes and explains how to control it by adjusting temperature, degree of reduction, and cooling rates...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cmp.t66770099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-337-9
... Abstract This chapter is a study of the microstructure of case-hardened steels. It explains what can be learned by examining grain size, microcracking, nonmetallic inclusions, and the effects of microsegregation. It identifies information-rich features, describing their ideal characteristics...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270150
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... originating from nonmetallic inclusions in the blade root. compressor blades energy-dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry fatigue fracture SEM fractography visual examination Summary A compressor blade in an aircraft engine failed in service. The failure was due to fatigue fracture originating...
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.56 (a) Fracture of a cold drawn eutectoid steel filament showing a large nonmetallic inclusion. SEM, BE. A polygonal nonmetallic inclusion that has not been deformed during hot working (see Chapter 11, “Hot Working” ) can be seen. SEM, BE. (b) Energy spectrum of the inclusion More
Image
Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.19 The influence of temperature on the relative plasticity of various typical nonmetallic inclusions in steels. Relative plasticity ν is measured as ν = nonmetallic inclusion plasticity/steel plasticity. Source: Ref 8 More