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Melting

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.tpmpa.t54480161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-318-8
...Abstract Abstract Casting is the most economical processing route for producing titanium parts, and unlike most metals, the properties of cast titanium are on par with those of wrought. This chapter covers titanium melting and casting practices -- including vacuum arc remelting, consumable...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.hss.t52790175
EISBN: 978-1-62708-356-0
...Abstract Abstract This chapter presents a brief description of the three-step process: melting, decarburizing, and alloying. It also discusses the following processes: wild process, rustless process, and Linde Argon-Oxygen decarburization process. argon-oxygen decarburization...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ssde.t52310155
EISBN: 978-1-62708-286-0
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses the steps in the primary processing of stainless steels: melting, refining, remelting, casting, and hot rolling. It provides information of the major categories of defects in hot rolled stainless steels, namely hot mill defects, inclusion-related defects...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.stg2.t61280041
EISBN: 978-1-62708-267-9
...Abstract Abstract This chapter discusses the melting and conversion of superalloys and the solidification challenges they present. Superalloys have high solute content which can lead to untreatable defects if they solidify too slowly. These defects, called freckles, are highly detrimental...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
...Abstract Abstract This chapter provides an overview of the types of melting furnaces and refractories for steel casting. It then presents information about arc furnace melting and induction melting cycles. The chapter also describes methods for the removal of phosphorous, the removal of sulfur...
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 11.2 Melting points of low melting compounds in the V 2 O 5 -Na 2 SO 4 system during heating and cooling. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.6 Melting point increase of paraffin series with molecular weight. Source: Ref 9.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 7.4 Principal braze alloy families and their melting ranges. Source: Ref 7.4 , p 7 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 2.36 Melting points of various metals. More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 5.13 Flow diagram of melting processes used to produce steel More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 3.6 Difference in free energy between liquid and solid close to the melting point. The curvature of G S and G L has been ignored. Adapted from Ref 3.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 12.3 Natural freezing and melting curves of a pure metal. Source: Ref 12.2 as published in Ref 12.1 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 12.7 Differential thermal analysis (DTA) responses to melting and freezing of a pure metal under ideal conditions. a, onset temperature; b, peak signal; c, peak temperature. Adapted from Ref 12.4 More
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Published: 01 March 2012
Fig. 12.18 Schematic diagrams of binary systems containing congruent melting compounds but having no association of the component atoms in the melt common. The diagram in (a) is consistent with the Gibbs-Konovalov Rule, whereas that in (b) violates the rule. Source: Ref 12.7 as published More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 4 Recrystallization temperature versus melting points More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.15 Grain-boundary oxidation and melting due to overheating during forging. Unetched. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.19 Schematic illustration of a coreless induction melting furnace More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.20 Typical channel induction melting furnace Source: Inductotherm More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.21 Selection of power-supply frequency for coreless induction melting furnaces as a function of furnace size. A = recommended frequency regime. B = acceptable frequency. C = furnace frequencies which have been used but which do not provide good results. D = unusable furnace frequencies More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 6.22 Relationship among furnace capacity, melting time, and power requirements for coreless induction melting of irons and steels Source: Radyne, Inc. More