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Medium-carbon steel

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.66 Formation of pro-eutectoid allotriomorphic ferrite in medium carbon steel containing C = 0.5% and Mn = 1.5% isothermally transformed at (a) 723 °C (1335 °F), (b) 688 °C (1270 °F), followed by quenching. Quenching was not sufficiently rapid to avoid the formation of a thin layer of very More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.67 Widmanstätten ferrite in a medium carbon steel. The ferrite plates in this case are disposed at an angle of 60° in the prior austenitic grain. Etchant: aqua regia. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.68 Medium carbon steel. Pro-eutectoid ferrite and pearlite. Allotriomorphic ferrite in the prior austenite grain boundaries, Widmanstätten ferrite in primary and secondary plates. Mostly “acicular” structure. Steel with a large prior austenitic grain size, probably due to overheating (see More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.69 Medium carbon steel containing Cr = 0.3%, as cast. Ferrite and pearlite. Widmanstätten ferrite. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.72 (a) Microstructure of a medium carbon steel containing C = 0.37%, Mn = 1.5%, V = 0.11% subjected to accelerated cooling from the austenitic field. Acicular ferrite, idiomorphic ferrite, allotriomorphic ferrite (in the prior austenitic grain boundaries) and pearlite. The areas between More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.26 Medium carbon steel, with a microstructure originally similar to the one in Fig. 10.23 (overheated). The steel has been subjected to a new austenitization for normalizing, in the intercritical region (temperature was too low for complete austenitization). The pro-eutectoid More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.27 Cast medium carbon steel annealed in the intercritical region (temperature was too low for complete austenitization). Pearlite areas transformed to austenite, but pro-eutectoid allotriomorphic and acicular ferrite regions did not. The region where austenite did form has transformed More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.30 Microstructure close to the surface of a medium carbon steel overheated. Ferrite delineating the prior austenite grain boundaries, acicular ferrite, and pearlite. Superficial decarburization is also present. The surface region is rich in acicular ferrite. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.25 Longitudinal cross section of a hot rolled plate of medium carbon steel, treated with calcium in the liquid state to achieve inclusion globularization. In this case, the inclusions are classified as globular oxides according to ASTM E45, severity 1.5, fine series. Courtesy More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.39 Longitudinal cross section of a medium carbon steel heavily cold worked. Deformed ferrite and pearlite. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.40 Transverse cross section of a medium carbon steel bar axially compressed (vertical direction in the image). Cold deformation of ferrite and pearlite can be seen. Etchant: nital. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 32 Medium-carbon steel microstructures from the same component at two locations separated by approximately 25 mm (1 in.). Each small scale division is 5 μm. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.28 Microstructure of medium-carbon steel with globules of cementite in ferrite matrix More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 24 Large axle shaft of medium-carbon steel with fatigue fracture across most of the cross section before final rupture. Note the smooth origin region (arrow) and gradually coarsening fracture surface as the fatigue crack progressed. Note that there was a thread groove running around More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 35 Close-up of a reduced area on a medium-carbon steel drive shaft showing the X-shaped crack pattern characteristic of reversed torsional fatigue. Reversed torsional fatigue causes approximately 45° spiral fatigue cracks on opposite diagonals. The original shear crack More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.7 Micrograph of a seam in cross section of a ¾ in. diam medium carbon steel bar, showing oxide and decarburization in the seam. 350×. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.52 Medium carbon steels quenched at a rate insufficient to guarantee complete transformation to martensite. (a) Steel containing C = 0.5%. Fine pearlite and bainite (elongated) formed from the prior-austenitic grain boundaries, in a martensitic matrix. Etchant: nital. (b) Fine pearlite More
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Published: 01 November 2013
Fig. 14 Typical Jominy hardenability curves for medium-carbon steels, austenitized at 845 °C (1550 °F) from initial normalized condition. Source: Ref 1 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.spsp2.t54410293
EISBN: 978-1-62708-265-5
... Medium-carbon steels are typically hardened for high-strength, high-fatigue-resistant applications by austenitizing, quenching to martensite, and tempering. This chapter explains how microalloying with vanadium, niobium, and/or titanium provides an alternate way to improve the mechanical...
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.2(b) Micrograph of medium-carbon AISI/SAE 1040 steel showing ferrite grains (white etching constituent) and pearlite (dark etching constituent). Etched in 4% picral followed by 2% nital. 300× More