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Laps

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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.58 Forging laps detected by surface crack examinations. Extensive decarburization of the lap region can be noticed when observing the reduction of the pearlite volume fraction. Etchant: nital 2%. Courtesy of M.M. Souza, Neumayer-Tekfor, Jundiaí, SP, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.51 Longitudinal cross section of fasteners presenting rolling folds or laps in different extents and locations. (a) Lap in the thread crest. (b) Lap close to the thread crest. (c) Lap in the thread root. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-7. Forging lap around a forged hub. Crack followed the normal flow-line pattern and retained oxidized scale along its surface. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 6 Alignment of mounted sample from Figure 5 for flat lap process. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 7 Flat lap process. Note the bullseye shape of the Newton’s rings. Thickness varies by 15.5 µm from bullseye to upper left corner due to convex nature of the part across 6.8 mm x 6.8 mm die. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 6 Illustration of the die layers that are removed using the parallel lapping film technique More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.32 Failure in a simple lap joint loaded in tension. (a) Stress concentrations. (b) Initiation of failure. Edge-opening crack (free arrow) formed and propagated by the high normal stress concentration. (c) Progression of joint rotation to fracture. Plastic bending of the joint region More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.33 Effect of overlap length on the failure stress in shear for a simple lap joint between mild steel components joined using a silver-base braze [ Sloboda 1961 ]. For short overlaps, failure is by shear. As the overlap length increases, the forces in the joint change from shear to peel More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.34 A lap joint showing step height, H , fillet radius, R , and contact angle, θ More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.35 Double lap joint More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 4.36 Recommended designs of (a) lap, (b) butt, and (c) strap joints for different stress environments More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.60 Typical locations for fretting fatigue cracking. (a) Bolted flange. (b) Lap joint. (c) Interference-fit fastener, shims, or gaskets can reduce fretting. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.56 Forging lap in a bar of ASTM A564 UNS 17400 (17-4PH) stainless steel. Transverse cross section. (There is an etching stain close to the lap caused by liquid retained inside the lap during the preparation process). Etchant: 2000 ml H 2 O + 300 ml H 2 O 2 + 350 ml HCl + 50 ml HNO 3 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.57 Forging lap. (a) Macrograph. (b) Ferrite, pearlite. Decarburization and oxides inside the discontinuity. Etchant: nital 2%. (c) Extensive decarburization and presence of oxides in the discontinuity. Etchant: nital 2%. Courtesy of M.M. Souza, Neumayer-Tekfor, Jundiaí, SP, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.59 Surface lap in hot rolled product, containing oxide particles inside the lap. For the metallography, the sample was mounted in contact with another plate (top, in the figure) to preserve the surface area to avoid rounding it during grinding and polishing. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 12.30 Lap shear stress at 300 and 4 K for 6061 aluminum bonded onto uniaxial S-901 glass laminates during laminate cure. The matrix resin provided the adhesive. Specimen numbers define various surface treatments. Range shown is the standard deviation ( Hillig, 1975a , 1975b ). More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 17 Voids resulting from lack of fill between the faying surfaces of a lap joint between two sheets of Hastelloy X brazed with BNi-1 filler metal. Unetched. 16.5 ×. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 6.18 Lap shear strength comparison of different joining methods. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 13.19 Single lap shear test More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 13.20 Typical double lap shear test More