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Intergranular fracture

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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.11 Percent of intergranular fracture on CVN specimen fracture surfaces as a function of tempering temperature for fully austenitized and quenched 52100 steel and 4340 steel. Shaded regions show fracture after tempering at temperatures usually used to produce high strength More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.12 Intergranular fracture surface of CVN-tested as-quenched 52100 steel austenitized above A CM at 965 °C (1770 °F). SEM micrograph. Source: Ref 19.40 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.13 Intergranular fracture surface of CVN-tested 4340 steel oil quenched and tempered at 350 °C (660 °F). SEM micrograph. Courtesy of J. Materkowski. Source: Ref 19.41 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.20 Intergranular fracture of 4340 steel containing 0.03% P and tempered at 400 °C (750 °F). Specimen was broken by impact loading at room temperature. Source: Ref 19.49 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.30 Percent intergranular fracture as a function of tempering temperature of 4130 specimens charged with hydrogen. Source: Ref 19.105 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 19.31 Intergranular fracture in hydrogen-charged quenched 4130 steel tempered at (a) 300 °C (570 °F), and (b) 400 °C (750 °F). Source: Ref 19.105 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 14 Intergranular fracture viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note that fracture takes place between the grains; thus, the fracture surface has a “rock candy” appearance that reveals the shapes of part of the individual grains. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 39 SEM micrograph showing an intergranular fracture mode, observed around the entire circumference at both fractures in the screw. Structure at top is the base metal; structure at bottom is cadmium plating. Original magnification: 1000×. Source: Ref 20 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 21 Intergranular fracture from hydrogen embrittlement, as seen through the SEM More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.23 Percent intergranular fracture, reduction in area, and strain-to-failure of iron, Fe + P, and Fe + P + Mn alloys tested at various cathodic potentials More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.24 Percent intergranular fracture and the normalized strain-to-failure plotted as a function of sulfur content at the grain boundary for straining electrode tests at a cathodic potential of −600 mV (SCE) More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 1.27 Percent intergranular fracture and reduction in area vs. grain-boundary composition of nickel for several cathodic test potentials. C s is the critical sulfur concentration corresponding to 50% intergranular fracture. Points labeled P are equivalent sulfur concentrations More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.4 Intergranular fracture of type 304 austenitic stainless steel following exposure to an aqueous CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 solution. (a) Primary rupture plane is shown intersecting the surface. Note the secondary intergranular cracks. Original magnification: 650×. (b) Classic intergranular More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.19 Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of (a) intergranular fracture in the ion-nitrided surface layer of a ductile iron (ASTM 80-55-06), (b) transgranular fracture by cleavage in ductile iron (ASTM 80-55-06), and (c) ductile fracture with equiaxed dimples from microvoid More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 10 SEM image of center of fisheye showing intergranular fracture More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 8 Intergranular fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note that fracture takes place between the grains; thus the fracture surface has a “rock-candy” appearance that reveals the shapes of part of the individual grains. Original magnification at 2000× More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 16 Example of hydrogen-embrittled steel. Intergranular fracture in an AISI 4130 steel heat treated to an ultimate tensile strength of 1281 MPa (186 ksi) and stressed at 980 MPa (142 ksi) while being charged with hydrogen More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.22 SEM images of (a) intergranular fracture in ion-nitrided layer of ductile iron (ASTM 80-55-06), (b) transgranular fracture by cleavage in ductile iron (ASTM 80-55-06), and (c) ductile fracture with equiaxed dimples from microvoid coalescence around graphite nodules in a ductile iron More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 42 Intergranular fracture in hardened steel, viewed under the scanning electron microscope. Note that fracture takes place between the grains; thus, the fracture surface has a “rock candy” appearance that reveals the shapes of part of the individual grains. Original magnification: 2000 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 43 Schematic illustrating intergranular fracture along grain boundaries. (a) Decohesion along grain boundaries of equiaxed grains. (b) Decohesion through a weak grain-boundary phase. (c) Decohesion along grain boundaries of elongated grains. Source: Ref 18 More