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Intergranular corrosion

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 1999
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.caaa.t67870063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-299-0
... Abstract This chapter describes the mechanisms, characteristics, and prevention of intergranular and exfoliation corrosion in various aluminum alloys. It discusses susceptible alloys and recommended tempers and presents several examples of exfoliation in aircraft components. It also explains...
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 1 Various types of intergranular corrosion. (a) Interdendritic corrosion in a cast structure. (b) Interfragmentary corrosion in a wrought, unrecrystallized structure. (c) Intergranluar corrosion in a recrystallized wrought structure. All etched with Keller’s reagent. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 8.4 Various types of intergranular corrosion. (a) Interdendritic corrosion in a cast structure. (b) Interfragmentary corrosion in a wrought, unrecrystallized structure. (c) Intergranular corrosion in a recrystallized wrought structure. All etched with Keller’s reagent. Original More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 5 Intergranular corrosion of a type 304L stainless steel tube in a shuttle orbiter ammonia boiler. (a) Test performed to show tube ductility. 1×. (b) Cross section through the thin-wall (0.2 mm, or 8 mils) tube revealing sensitization on outside diameter due to carbonaceous deposit formed More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 13.8 Intergranular corrosion produced by sensitizing a 410 steel on tempering. Corrosion test: 14 days in 20% salt fog. Source: Ref 13.8 . Copyright: NACE International, 1953 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 3.8 Effect of carbon and nickel content on intergranular corrosion penetration rate of 18 wt% Cr-base stainless steels. Alloys sensitized for 100 h at 550 °C (1022 °F). Immersion in boiling 65% nitric acid. Pds., periods (48 h) of exposure. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 June 2007
Fig. 5.38 Effect of carbon content and cooling rate on intergranular corrosion of hydrogen-sintered 316. IG, intergranular. Source: Ref 45 . Reprinted with permission from MPIF, Metal Powder Industries Federation, Princeton, NJ More
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Published: 31 December 2020
Fig. 17 Intergranular corrosion in austenitic stainless steel. (a) Section through the center of the outside sidebar. Original magnification: 35×. (b) Evidence of intergranular corrosion. 10% oxalic acid, original magnification: 500×. Images courtesy of Jon Dossett More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 14.6 Strain-assisted intergranular corrosion attack in alloy HR3C after testing at 600 °C (1110 °F) for 250 h in CO-32H 2 -4CO 2 -0.2H 2 S with (a) 1.3% strain and (b) 2% strain. Corrosion products formed on the metal surface were also observed. Note: the tested specimen surface More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 14.7 Scanning electron backscattered images showing intergranular corrosion penetration along with the x-ray maps for Cr, O, and S for alloy HR3C after testing at 600 °C (1110 °F) for 1810 h in CO-32H 2 -4CO 2 -0.2H 2 S with 2.2% strain. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 1 Comparison of pitting and intergranular corrosion morphologies. (a) Pitting-type corrosion in the surface of an aircraft wing plank from an alloy 7075–T6 extrusion. (b) Intergranular corrosion in alloy 7075–T6 plate. Grain boundaries were attacked, causing the grains to separate. Both More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5 Intergranular corrosion (weld decay) of stainless steel weldments More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 6 (a) Planar and (b) cross-sectional views of intergranular corrosion (grain dropping) in a sensitized austenitic stainless steel. As-polished. (a) 50×. (b) 100×. Courtesy of G.F. Vander Voort, Carpenter Technology Corporation More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 9 Intergranular corrosion of a contaminated E-Brite stainless steel weld. Electrolytically etched with 10% oxalic acid. 200×. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 10 Intergranular corrosion of the inside surface HAZ of E-Brite stainless steel adjacent to the weld fusion line. Electrolytically etched with 10% oxalic acid. 100× More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 31 Intergranular corrosion on the external surface of the flange and IGSCC in the weld HAZ. Note that the type 316 weld and the wrought stainless steel pipe section were unaffected by corrosion. 5× More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 32 Intergranular corrosion at the external surface of the flange and IGSCC next to the flange fillet. 5× More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 33 Intergranular corrosion at the external surface of the flange. The voids are the locations of the spalled grains. 50× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 Planar (a) and cross-sectional (b) views of intergranular corrosion (grain dropping) in a sensitized austenitic stainless steel. As-polished. (a) 50×. (b) 100×. Courtesy of G.F. Vander Voort, Carpenter Technology Corporation More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 39 Intergranular corrosion of a contaminated E-Brite ferritic stainless steel weld. Electrolytically etched with 10% oxalic acid. 200× More