1-20 of 133 Search Results for

High-density polyethylene

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 9.16 Stages of neck formation and propagation in high-density polyethylene. Source: Ref 9.3 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 10 Time-to-failure of high-density polyethylene pipes at different stresses and temperatures. Source: Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 10 Rheological profile of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 26 Melting point and percent crystallinity of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) 10 mcal/s range; 10 °C/min (18 °F/min), 7.1 mg (1.5 gr). Source: Ref 29 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Experimental R -curve for a high-density polyethylene showing the dashed blunting line and the absence of blunting behavior. Source: Ref 35 More
Image
Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 3.22 Viscosity versus shear strain rate for high-density polyethylene at temperatures of 170, 190, and 210 °C (340, 375, and 410 °F). Shear thinning is evident by the reduction in viscosity as the strain rate increases, and thermal softening is evident by the temperature effect. More
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 14.1 Recycling symbols for polymers. (1) Polyethylene terephthalate, also indicated by PET and called polyester. (2) High-density polyethylene (also PE-HD).(3) Polyvinyl chloride, or PVC. (4) Low-density polyethylene (PE-LD), or LLDPE for very-low-density polyethylene. (5) Polypropylene More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 17 Heat-deflection temperature per ASTM D 648 at 1.8 MPa (0.264 ksi) of thermoplastics according to thermomechanical analysis; 5 °C/min (9 °F/min) in flexure. PVC, polyvinyl chloride; LDPE, low-density polyethylene; HDPE, high-density polyethylene; PC, polycarbonate More
Image
Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 3 Typical hardness values of plastics compared with the hardness values of metals. HDPE, high-density polyethylene; PA, polyamide; POM, polyoxymethylene; CEPE, chain-extended polyethylene; CF, composite, carbon fiber composite; PS, polystyrene; PEN, polyethylene naphthalene-2,6 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730149
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... ( Fig. 14.1 ) to identify several of the more common plastics for recycling. Fig. 14.1 Recycling symbols for polymers. (1) Polyethylene terephthalate, also indicated by PET and called polyester. (2) High-density polyethylene (also PE-HD).(3) Polyvinyl chloride, or PVC. (4) Low-density...
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Effect of thin brittle film on stress-strain behavior of high density polyethylene. Source: Ref 51 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 42 Effect of thin, brittle film on stress-strain behavior of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Source: Ref 36 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 31 Relative thermal stability of polymers by thermogravimetric analysis; 10 mg (0.15 gr) at 5 °C/min (9 °F/min), in nitrogen; HDPE, high-density polyethylene More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 A 1000 h creep modulus of several polymers as a function of temperature. PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; PP, polypropylene; HDPE, high-density polyethylene; T g , glass transition temperature More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
; PBI, polybenzimidazole; PEEK, polyetheretherketone; PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene; UHMWPE, ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene; HDPE, high-density polyethylene. (a) S , tensile strength; ε, elongation to break More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780305
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... of magnitude or more in many cases. This is particularly true in the relatively recent development of linear low-density polyethylene, which incorporates the longer comonomers into its backbone chain in relatively high quantities. Nylons Just as in glassy plastics, orientation significantly improves...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730161
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... (plate) Graphite Magnesia Quartz SiC Melamine Formaldehyde phenol Formaldehyde urea Formaldehyde rubber (vulcanized) Polyethylene (high-density) Polyethylene (low-density) Polystyrene Polyvinyl chloride Polytetrafluoroethylene Polymethyl methacrylate Nylon Density, Mg/m3 2.7 8.5 8.8 7.15 8.9 3.52 1.74...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ems.t53730099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-283-9
... crystallinity. There is no branching in high-density polyethylene, but low-density polyethylene is highly branched. Glass Transition The bonds between neighboring molecular chains are weak van der Waals bonds. Therefore, most polymers do not readily crystallize. Instead, on cooling they form an amorphous...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.9781627082815
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cfap.t69780433
EISBN: 978-1-62708-281-5
... ionization detector ber-reinforced polymer Fourier transform infrared complex modulus elastic, or storage, modulus viscous, or loss, modulus loss tangent, or dissipation factor gel permeation chromatography height Planck s constant high-density polyethylene heat-de ection temperature high-impact polystyrene...