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HK-40

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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.48 Elongation to fracture as a function of rupture life of HK-40 and HK-30 comparing the as-cast specimens tested in air and the precarburized (thoroughly carburized) specimens tested in H 2 -1%CH 4 ( a c = 0.8) (to avoid decarburization) after creep-rupture testing at 1000 °C (1832 °F More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.49 Elongation to fracture as a function of rupture life of HK-40 and HK-30 comparing the data from tests in the carburizing environment (i.e., H 2 -1%CH 4 [ a c = 0.8]) and that from air tests at 1000 °C (1832 °F). Source: Ref 63 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.51 1% creep strengths of HK-40 and HK-30 tested at 1000 °C (1832 °F) in air, H 2 -1%CH 4 ( a c = 0.8), and for precarburized specimens tested in H 2 -1%CH 4 . Source: Ref 63 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.32 Effect of silicon on the carburization resistance of HK-40 with different silicon levels tested at 1100 °C (2010 °F) for 520 h in carbon granulate (pack carburization test). Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.38 Effect of machining on the carburization resistance of cast HK-40 alloy. Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.43 Carbon concentration profiles for HK-40 alloy after testing at 1000 °C (1830 °F) for 100 h in a carburizing environment ( a c = 0.8, p O 2 is shown in Fig. 5.18 ) with and without injection of 100 ppm H 2 S. The specimen was a flat coupon with both sides being exposed More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.44 Effect of H 2 S on the carburization behavior of HK-40 alloy. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.50 Comparative creep curves of HK-40 tested at 1000 °C (1832 °F) and 15 MPa in air and H 2 -1% CH 4 ( a c = 0.8). Source: Ref 63 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 6-35 Creep-rupture properties of Type HK-40 alloy. The scatter bands shown are set arbitrarily at ±20% of the stress for the central tendency line. Such a range usually embraces test data for similar alloy compositions, but should not be considered statistically significant confidence limits More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-5 Variation of Poisson’s ratio with temperature for equiaxed HK-40 material ( 10 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-15 Variation of specified heat with temperature of the HK-40 alloy ( 5 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 6-34 Temperature dependence of elevated-temperature strength properties of cast heat-resistant high alloy grade HK-40 ( 43 ) More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.39 Detrimental effect of the electropolished surface condition on the carburization resistance of HK-40 alloy tested at 825 °C (1520 °F) in an environment with 0.8 a c and the oxygen potential shown in Fig. 5.18 . Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 27-16 Variation of specific heat with temperature for several wrought stainless steels (10). The nearest cast equivalent grades are: 304 ~ CF-8; 310 ~ CK-20, HK-40; 316 - CF-8M; 410 - CA-15. More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080097
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... that Type 314 stainless steel (2.04% Si) was significantly more carburization resistant than HK-40 (1.35% Si), HP-40Nb (1.29% Si), and alloy 800H (0.4% Si), as shown in Fig. 5.19 . Also revealed by the test results was that the model alloys were significantly less resistant to carburization than...
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 6-32 Bar graph showing limiting creep stresses for the HK and HN cast alloys ( 40 ) More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 5.16 Carbon concentration profiles of HK and HP alloys tested at 1050 °C (1920 °F) for 1200 h in 37%N 2 -40%H 2 -20%CO-3% CH 4 ( a c = 1.0, p O 2 = 3.4 × 10 –20 atm). Source: Ref 33 More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... of the most common heat-resistant grades, H, is shown in Figure 27-5 . Fig. 27-5 Variation of Poisson’s ratio with temperature for equiaxed HK-40 material ( 10 ) Shear Modulus The shear modulus is the ratio of shear stress to shear strain below the elastic limit with the units of psi...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... (310) 38 165 HHI 85 (586) 50 (348) 25 185 HH II 80 (552) 40 (276) 15 180 HI 80 (552) 45 (310) 12 180 HK 75 (517) 50 (348) 17 170 HL 82 (563) 52 (359) 19 192 HN 68 (469) 38 (262) 13 160 HP 71 (490) 40 (276) 12 176 HT 70 (483) 40 (276) 10 180...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.sch6.t68200377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-354-6
... machinability. For high carbon heat-resistant high alloy steels, such as the HK-40 grade, improved machinability is sometimes reported for various high-temperature treatments. Such heat treatments, however, may alter the carbide distribution and are then likely to reduce the creep life at elevated...