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Glass

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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 24 Chop marks on the fracture surface of the glass fibers in a glass/polyimide composite tested as a notched four-point bend specimen that failed in compression. 1800× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 5.55 A close-up view of the 35 mm camera and ground glass screen on the metallograph in Fig. 5.54 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1.11 Structure of a silicate glass consists of tetrahedra with silicon atoms in the centers and oxygen atoms on the corners. Source: Ref 1.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 2.13 Golf clubs made from metallic glass. Courtesy of: Otis Buchanan, Liquidmetal Technology, Lake Forrest, CA More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.2 Silica glass is composed of tetrahedra with four O −2 ions (shown by open circles) surrounding Si+ 4 ions. Each O −2 ion is shared by two tetrahedra. Source: Ref 8.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.5 Until the 19th century, panes of glass were made by spinning a rod with a glob of glass at the end and letting the centrifugal force form a disc from which panes could be cut. Source: Ref 8.3 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.7 Boron trioxide glass. Each boron atom is covalently bonded to three oxygen atoms, which form a triangle around the boron atom. Each oxygen atom is shared by two triangles. Source: Ref 8.2 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8.8 Typical fracture patterns of three grades of glass. (a) Annealed (untempered) glass. (b) Laminated safety glass. (c) Tempered glass. Source: Ref 8.4 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Glass transition depression data (calculated). Curve as predicted by Eq 1 . Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 Flexural creep compliance of parallel glass-fiber-reinforced aromatic-amine-cured epoxy resin (EPON Resin 826). t , time; a T , amount of curve shift More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 10 Degradation of glass laminates in water at 100 °C (212 °F) for different polyester-resin matrices. BPA, bisphenol A More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 16 Relationships among glass transition temperature ( T g ), melt temperature ( T m ), molecular weight, and polymer properties. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 17 Variation of glass transition temperature ( T g ) with cure time and temperature. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 7 Differential scanning calorimetry used to detect glass transitions within amorphous thermoplastic resins. The (I) indicates that the numerical temperature was determined as the inflection point on the curve. More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 12 Exposure of fiber splinters in a glass/polyimide laminate having inadequate resin content, following mode I tension loading of the specimen. 40× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 22 Radial marks on the surfaces of glass fibers indicative of tensile failure in a glass/polyimide composite following failure of a notched four-point bend specimen. 3000× More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 26 Effect of short glass content in polybutylene terephthalate on Gardner impact values measured at 20 °C (70 °F) More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 27 Effect of glass length on Gardner impact strength More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 16 Correlation of T g with degree of cure by isothermal DSC of epoxy-glass laminate. Source: Ref 126 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Glass-transition depression data (calculated). Curve as predicted by Eq 5 . Source: Ref 19 More