1-20 of 223 Search Results for

Gear teeth

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 22 Schematic of rolling-sliding action inherent in gear teeth. As gear teeth contact, rolling (R) and sliding (S) stresses are formed by the relative movement. Pure rolling occurs only at the pitch line, and on each gear the direction of sliding reverses at the pitch line. Analysis More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-44. Spiral bevel gear teeth showing contact wear. Insert A is a tooth area nonworn. Insert B shows abrasive wear clearly cutting away 1/8 in. of the surface without damage to underlying material. More
Image
Published: 31 March 2024
Fig. 1.13 Backlash between pinion and gear teeth More
Image
Published: 31 March 2024
Fig. 3.7 Acceptable involute and lead profiles of ring gear teeth More
Image
Published: 31 March 2024
Fig. 3.16 Tooth index variation error of ring gear teeth with two peaks More
Image
Published: 31 March 2024
Fig. 3.17 Tooth index variation error of ring gear teeth with four peaks More
Image
Published: 31 March 2024
Fig. 8.18 Gear teeth contact patterns with improved gearbox design More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 1-8. Basic stresses that are applied to gear teeth. Often, two or three are simultaneously applied to a specific area. More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-13. Helical gear teeth, 2×. Pitting initiated along the pitchline and just above the pitchline. In some areas, the progression has been continuous. More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-23. Spiral bevel gear teeth, 1.5×. Original pitting low on the active profile gives initiation to a fast and extensive progression of spalling over the top face and down the back profile. This is often called the “cyclone effect.” More
Image
Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-36. Spiral gear teeth, 1×. Tooth bending impact with peak loads being applied high on the profile over the top corner of the heel end of the convex (loaded) side. More
Image
Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 8 Schematic of rolling-sliding action inherent in gear teeth: (a) beginning of contact, (b) end of contact. As gear teeth contact, rolling (R) and sliding (S) stresses are formed by the relative movement. Pure rolling occurs only at the pitch line, and on each gear the direction More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 95 Bending fatigue strength of gear teeth at (a) tooth gap hardening and (b) flank hardening for various steels. Broken lines denote confidence limit according to DIN 3990. Source: Ref 36 More
Image
Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Cross section of worn gear teeth. Approximate width of steel segment shown is 23 mm (0.9 in.). More
Image
Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 Effect of process pressure in ion nitriding of gear teeth. Courtesy of Plateg GmbH More
Image
Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 20 The depth and extent of hardening in these induction hardened gear teeth made of AISI 1055 carbon steel was determined by macroetching with 10% aqueous HNO 3 . Surface hardness was 53 to 54 HRC while the unhardened area was about 23 HRC. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 11.33 Improved grain flow in gear teeth resulting from high-velocity forging (sevenfold increase in fatigue life) ( Ref 11.39 ). Courtesy of Machine Design More
Image
Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.12 Contact stress profile between two meshing gear teeth More
Image
Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 9.1 Variations in hardening patterns obtainable on gear teeth by induction hardening More
Image
Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 1-32 The depth and extent of hardening in these induction-hardened gear teeth made of AISI 1055 carbon steel was determined by macroetching with 10% aqueous HNO 3 . Surface hardness was 53 to 54 HRC (Rockwell hardness on the C scale), while the unhardened area was about 23 HRC. More