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Fractures

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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 6-2(c). Of the 15 teeth that failed by tooth bending fatigue, two fractures intersected a bolt hole (see Fig. 6-2a and 6-2b ). Four other fractures touched the apex (A) of a bolt hole. Nine teeth failed by tooth bending fatigue completely away from a bolt hole. All 15 have an origin (O More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 20 Fracture surfaces of an aluminum alloy lug. Fractures originated by SCC on the surface of a diametrical hole, at A and B. The crack was then propagated by fatigue, as evidenced by the presence of beach marks at C More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.26 General features of fatigue fractures. Source: Ref 16.2 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 8 Drive shaft pinion with fatigue fractures propagating from the acute-angular edge of the helical gear. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 2 Mode I tension interlaminar fractures that propagated at various angles to the direction of fiber reinforcement. (a) Fracture between adjacent 0° and 90° plies. (b) Fracture between 45° and –45° plies. 2000×. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 5 Interlaminar mode II shear fractures that propagated at an angle to the direction of fiber reinforcement. (a) Delamination between 0° and 90° plies. 5000×. (b) Fracture between 45° and –45° plies. 2000×. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 21 Examples of translaminar tension fractures. (a) Translaminar tension fracture in a graphite/epoxy composite. Note fiber bundles and individual fiber pullout. 400×. Source: Ref 2 . (b) Translaminar tension failure with localized area of flat fracture. 2000×. Source: Ref 2 . (c) Radial More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 23 Examples of translaminar compression fractures. (a) Translaminar compression fracture with extensive postfailure damage to fiber ends. 750×. (b) Translaminar compression-generated fiber kink in graphite/epoxy fabric. 100×. (c) Flexural fracture characteristics on fiber ends More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 40 Bending fatigue fractures in several teeth of a grade 8620 steel spur gear, carburized and hardened to 60 HRC in the case. It can be seen that tooth A fractured first, for it has the largest fatigue area, originating in the fillet on the arrow side of the tooth. Gear teeth More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.17 Typical appearances of torsional fractures. Source: Ref 2.9 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.43 Characteristics of crack direction and branching in fractures of brittle materials from (a) impact, (b) bending, (c) torsion, and (d) internal pressure More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.13 General features of fatigue fractures More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.15 Schematic of marks on surfaces of fatigue fractures produced in smooth and notched components with round, square, and rectangular cross sections and in thick plates under various loading conditions at high and low nominal stress More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 2 Appearance of (a) ductile and (b) brittle tensile fractures in unnotched cylindrical specimens. Courtesy of G. Vander Voort. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 35 Examples of cleavage fractures. (a) Twist boundary, cleavage steps, and river patterns in an Fe-0.01C-0.24Mn-0.02Si alloy that was fractured by impact. (b) Tongues (arrows) on the surface of a 30% Cr steel weld metal that fractured by cleavage. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 37 Examples of cleavage fractures. (a) Feather pattern on a single grain of a chromium steel weld metal that failed by cleavage. (b) Cleavage steps in a Cu-25at.%Au alloy that failed by transgranular stress-corrosion cracking. Courtesy of B.D. Lichter, Vanderbilt University. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 23 Transgranular and intergranular hydrogen embrittlement fractures. (a) Transgranular cleavage fracture in hydrogen embrittled annealed type 301 austenitic stainless steel; (b) Intergranular decohesion fracture in hydrogen embrittled 4130 steel heat treated to 1275 MPa (185 ksi). Source More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 19 Appearance of ductile (a) and brittle (b) tensile fractures. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 4.22. Morphologies of fractures (at left) and spikes (at right) in low-cycle fatigue specimens of Udimet 710 tested isothermally with 5-h hold times at a strain range of 2% ( Ref 63 ). Top pair: 730 °C (1350 °F); T,T morphology. Middle pair: 790 °C (1450 °F); I,M morphology. Bottom pair More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 9 Bending-fatigue fractures in several teeth of a spur gear of AISI 8620 steel, carburized and hardened to 60 HRC in the case. The tooth marked A apparently broke first, as the result of a fatigue crack that originated in the fillet to the left of the tooth (arrow). After this tooth broke More