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Fatigue life

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.fdsm.t69870045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-344-7
... features of the Manson-CoffinBasquin and Langer models Fig. 3.33 High-cycle-fatigue data for a range of metals and alloys. Source: Ref 3.31 Fig. 3.34 Comparison of high-frequency data with fatigue-life predictions for annealed 316 stainless steel at room temperature. (a) Four-point...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250293
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... in material that may lead to premature gear fatigue failure. The topics covered are alignment, gear tooth, surface durability and breakage of gear tooth, life determined by contact stress and bending stress, analysis of gear tooth failure by breakage after pitting, and metallurgical flaws that reduce the life...
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 10.34 Relation between percent of life to crack initiation and fatigue life data from Ref 10.32 . Source: Ref 10.32 More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 12.20 Relation between percent of life to crack initiation and fatigue life. Source: Ref 12.5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 1 The process of fatigue. (a) Cyclic loading. (b) Fatigue life of steel with an endurance limit and aluminum with no endurance limit. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 21 Effect of case depth on fatigue life. Fatigue tests on induction-hardened 1038 steel automobile axle shafts 32 mm (1.25 in.) in diameter. Case depth ranges given on the chart are depths to 40 HRC. Shafts with lower fatigue life had a total case depth to 20 HRC of 4.5 to 5.2 mm (0.176 More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 9.18. Fatigue-life data for IN 738 samples tested under thermomechanical fatigue conditions ( Ref 18 and 25 ). (a) Plot using strain-range criterion. (b) Plot using maximum-tensile-stress criterion. More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 4.8 Effect of mean stress on fatigue life. (a) Notched specimen fatigue lives resulting from two types of initial overload; also lives of un-notched specimens subjected to strain histories estimated to occur at notch. (b) Details of load history A. (c) Details of load history B. Source More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 17 a) SEM image of a resonator designed to test polysilicon for fatigue life. b) A fatigue initiation crack in a specimen similar to the one above. More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.6 Relationship between fatigue life, pore size, and DAS. Reprinted with permission from Ref 4 . More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 11 Effect of mean stress on fatigue life. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 13 Histograms showing fatigue-life distribution for 57 specimens of a 75S-T6 aluminum alloy tested at 207 MPa (30 ksi). Note the influence of a (a) linear or (b) logarithmic plot of cycles to failure N on the shape of the histogram. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 45 Effect of geometrical stress concentrations on fatigue life. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 54 Effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on fatigue life of A201.0-T7 aluminum casting. Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 20 Effect of carburizing and surface hardening on fatigue life. Comparison of carburized, through-hardened, and induction-hardened transmission shafts tested in torsion. Arrow in lower bar on chart indicates that one shaft had not failed after the test was stopped at the number of cycles More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 3 Fatigue life of riveted joints with different tension (T)/shear (S)/bearing (B) ratios. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 10 Fatigue life improvement with cold working. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 24 Range of postweld fatigue life improvement techniques. TIG, tungsten inert gas. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 27 Fatigue life in polytetrafluoroethylene with increasing crystallinity. Δ, low crystallinity, air quenched; □, medium crystallinity, 33.3 °C/h cooling; O, high crystallinity, 5.6 °C/h cooling. Test frequency, 30 Hz. R -ratio not identified. Source: Ref 24 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.21 Fatigue life improvement with cold working. Source: Ref 8.7 More