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Fatigue cracking

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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 28 Thermal fatigue cracking of a spur gear. (a) Radial cracking due to frictional heat against the thrust face. Original magnification at 0.4×. (b) Progression of thermal fatigue produced by the frictional heat. Original magnification at 1.5× More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-11. Differential internal spider and pinions. Fatigue cracking origin at toe end of the root to bore section, which is rather thin. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 14.13 Thermal fatigue cracking in turbine blade More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 14.18 Thermal-mechanical fatigue cracking on internal surface of a nickel-base superalloy forward liner of a gas turbine combustor. Note: One crack extends from a keyhole slot (right), while another can be seen in the area adjacent to an airhole (left). 1.5× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 14.19 Low-cycle fatigue cracking induced by thermal strains in the rivet slot of a nickel-base superalloy disk More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 63 Failure of boiler tube wall due to corrosion fatigue cracking. (a) Wedge-shaped corrosion fatigue crack filled with corrosion product. As the cyclic process continues, this crack will eventually propagate through the tube wall. (b) A family of longitudinal corrosion fatigue cracks More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 3.60 Typical locations for fretting fatigue cracking. (a) Bolted flange. (b) Lap joint. (c) Interference-fit fastener, shims, or gaskets can reduce fretting. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 7 Fatigue cracking in an aircraft wing fitting for the F-111 aircraft No. 94 that crashed in 1969. (a) and (b) Location of the left wing pivot box fitting. The 22 mm (0.91 in.) material defect was not observed during inspection, and a fatigue crack initiated and grew for only about 0.38 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 15 Fatigue cracking from the weld root. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 July 2009
Fig. 3.13 Creep-fatigue cracking on H-13 tool steel at 593 °C (1100 °F) under PC-type loading. Source: Ref 3.3 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 7 Fatigue cracking from the weld root More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.mmfi.t69540379
EISBN: 978-1-62708-309-6
... Abstract This appendix presents an analytical model that estimates damage rates for both crack initiation and propagation mechanisms. The model provides a nonarbitrary definition of fatigue crack initiation length, which serves as an analytical link between initiation and propagation analyses...
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.25 Schematic of cracking mechanisms with creep-fatigue interaction. (a) Fatigue cracking dominant. (b) Creep cracking dominant. (c) Creep damage influences fatigue crack growth. (d) Creep cracking and fatigue crack occur simultaneously. More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 58 Influence of texture on fatigue crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V. Fatigue crack growth rates are higher when basal planes are loaded in tension. The elastic modulus in tension for the basal texture (B) is 109 GPa (15.8 × 10 6 psi); for the transverse texture (T), 126 GPa (18.3 × 10 6 psi More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 10 Subcase-origin fatigue. (a) As the name implies, subcase fatigue cracks originate deep within the steel at the region below the case, where the core metal is comparatively soft in relation to the case itself. The fatigue cracks spread laterally, parallel to the surface, and then join More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 3 Thermal fatigue failure and conventional fatigue crack propagation fracture during reversed load cycling of acetal. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 15 Fretting scar on fatigued steel specimen showing location of fatigue crack (arrow). Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 7.25 Fatigue crack growth per fatigue cycle ( da / dN ) versus stress intensity variation ( Δ K ) per cycle. The C and n are constants that can be obtained from the intercept and slope, respectively, of the linear log da / dN versus log Δ K plot. This equation for fatigue crack More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.24 Fatigue failure surface from a piston rod. The fatigue crack initiated near a forging flake at the center and propagated slowly outward. The outer area is the region of final brittle fracture overload. Source: Ref 16.5 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 24 Subcase-origin fatigue. (a) As the name implies, subcase fatigue cracks originate deep within the steel at the region below the case, where the core metal is comparatively soft in relation to the case itself. The fatigue cracks spread laterally, parallel to the surface, then join More