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Fasteners

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 July 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.bcp.t52230441
EISBN: 978-1-62708-298-3
...Abstract Abstract This chapter explains how to join beryllium parts using adhesive bonding and mechanical fastening techniques and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each method. It describes the stresses that need to be considered when designing adhesive bonds, the benefits...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
...Abstract Abstract This chapter presents a comprehensive coverage of mechanical fastening methods. It begins with a discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical fastening followed by sections providing information on mechanically fastened joints and the selection of the correct...
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should also be more noble than base metals. Transitions joints can be used More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.47 Longitudinal cross section of fasteners cold formed from a hot-worked wire rod. The “fibers” of the original material can be seen, as well as the orientation change caused by deformation. (a) Detail of the head of a special fastener. (b) M5x30 bolt. Etchant: hot 30% hydrochloric acid More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.48 Longitudinal cross section of the threaded region of M5 fasteners. (a) and (c) Rolled thread. (b) and (d) Machined (or cut) thread. The deformation of the “fibers” of the original material causes a large reduction of the fiber spacing close to the thread roots in the case of rolled More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 12.51 Longitudinal cross section of fasteners presenting rolling folds or laps in different extents and locations. (a) Lap in the thread crest. (b) Lap close to the thread crest. (c) Lap in the thread root. More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.1 Typical structural fasteners. Source: Ref 8.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.16 Types of blind fasteners. Source: Ref 8.3 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.17 Installation of blind fasteners. Source: Ref 8.1 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.18 Selection of spring clip steel fasteners. Courtesy ACS Manufacturing Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 8.24 Integral fasteners: (a) lanced tabs to attach wires or shafts to sheet metal, (b) embossed protrusions similar to rivets, (c) single-lock seaming, (d) beading, and (e) dimpling. Source: Ref 8.5 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 10.5 Mechanical joints and fasteners used for plastics. Source: Ref 10.2 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11 Filiform corrosion of an aluminum aircraft skin around steel fasteners. (a) Before paint removal, showing paint cracking and blistering. (b) After paint removal More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3 (Part 1) Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3 (Part 2) Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 8.52 Typical aerospace structural fasteners, (a) rivets, (b) pin and collar, (c) bolts and nuts, (d) blind fasteners. Source: Ref 8.1 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 6 Wedge-test details for fasteners. D , diameter of bolt; C , clearance of wedge hole; R , radius; T , thickness of wedge at short side hole; W , wedge angle More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 7.21 Mechanical joints and fasteners used for plastics. Source: Ref 7.8 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 11.23 Blind fasteners better in fatigue than screws and nut plates. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 11.24 Blind fasteners. Source: Ref 4 More