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Explosions

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270045
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
...Abstract Abstract This chapter describes the characteristic damage of a mid-air explosion and how it appears in metal debris recovered from crash sites of downed aircraft. It explains that explosive forces produce telltale signs such as petaling, curling, spalling, spikes, reverse slant...
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 10.5 Detonator fuse explosive train. The electric detonator ignites an explosive transfer mechanism, which fires detonator A. This fires across a 0.30 in. gap to ignite detonator B, which then ignites the linear charges. More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.22 Schematic showing key components used in parallel gap explosion welding process. Source: Ref 6.11 More
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Published: 01 November 2011
Fig. 6.23 Bond zone pattern typical of explosion clad metals. Materials are type 304L stainless steel and medium-carbon steel. 20×. Source: Ref 6.1 More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 2.32 Confined system for explosive forming. Dimensions in inches More
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Published: 01 December 1984
Figure 3-41 Microstructure of explosively hardened Hadfield Mn steel (sheet martensite) revealed using 2% nital followed by 20% aqueous sodium metabisulfite, 375×. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.20 Exit nozzle of N-155 produced by tube spinning and subsequent explosive forming. (Dimensions in inches) More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.21 Flame deflector of IN-718 produced from sheet by explosive forming with three successive charges. (Dimensions in inches) More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 6.22 Welded cylinder of HA-25 in position for explosive forming. (Dimensions in inches) More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 6.12 (Part 2) (e) 0.04% C, annealed (0.04C, wt%). Subjected to explosive shock loading. Picral 1000×. (f) to (h) 0.1% C, normalized (0.09C-0.01Si-0.45Mn. Necked region of tensile testpiece. (f) Picral (comparatively heavy etch). 2000×. (g) Scanning electron micrograph. Picral More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.10 Steel to steel (0.15% C) explosive weld, made under conditions that produce a planar weld. (a) Weld interface. 1% nital. 100×. (b) Weld interface. 1% nital. 1000×. (c) Weld interface: heated at 925 °C for 30 min and cooled at 500 °C/h after welding. 1% nital. 1000×. (d) Weld More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.11 (Part 1) Steel to steel (0.1 5 % C) explosive weld, made under conditions that produce an undulating weld interface. (a) and (b) Weld interface: sectioned parallel to direction of propagation of jet. (a) 1% nital. 100×. (b) 1% nital. 1000×. (c) and (d) Weld interface More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.12 Effects of heat treatment after explosive welding steel to steel (0.15% C). Same weld as illustrated in Fig. 11.11 except for post-welding heat treatment. (a) and (b) Heated at 650 °C for 30 min. (a) 1% nital. 100×. (b) 1% nital. 1000×. (c) and (d) Heated at 925 °C for 30 More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.13 Steel to steel (0.15% C) explosive weld made under conditions of considerable overpressure. (a) 1% nital. 100×. (b) 1% nital. 500×. More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11.14 Weld interface of an explosive weld of 0.15% C steel plate and commercially pure aluminum plate. (a) 1% nital. 10× (b) and (c) 1% nital. 100×. More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 11.3 Process variations of explosive forming techniques. (a) Contact operation. Source: Ref 11.8 . (b) Standoff operation. Source: Ref 11.9 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 6.20 Schematic diagram of explosion tear test More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
...., manufacturing caprolactam was completely destroyed and reduced to ashes, and the surrounding community was demolished with many fatalities, following a powerful explosion of warlike dimensions inside the plant ( Ref 1 ). The details of this disaster have been described in Chapter 2, “Common Causes of Failures...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.jub.t53290137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-306-5
... such as diffusion welding, forge welding, roll welding, coextrusion welding, cold welding, friction welding, friction stir welding, explosion welding, and ultrasonic welding. coextrusion welding cold welding diffusion welding explosion welding forge welding friction welding roll welding ultrasonic...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
... (diffusion welding, explosion welding, friction welding, or ultrasonic welding), brazing, or soldering where alloying between the metals is normally insignificant. This chapter describes the factors influencing joint integrity and discusses the corrosion behavior of dissimilar metal weldments. brazing...