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Cr-Mo steel

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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 3.57 Microstructure of a Ni-Cr-Mo steel held at 565 °C (1050 °F) under a load of 210 MPa (30 ksi), showing (a) initial void formation at the austenite grain boundaries, (b) void linkup, and (c) separation of an austenite grain boundary. 4% picral and HCl etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 3.13. Variation of average elongation rate with time to rupture for 1¼Cr½Mo steels ( Ref 91 ). Different symbols denote different temperatures in the range 510 to 620 °C (950 to 1150 °F). More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 7.3. Allowable stress as a function of temperature for commonly used Cr-Mo steels, from Section VIII, Division 1 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. 2.81 Creep recovery. (a) Test data for Ni-Cr-Mo steel at 450 °C (840 °F). Source: Ref 2.42 . (b) Schematic representation of the phenomenon. Loading produces an immediate elastic strain followed by viscous flow. Unloading produces an immediate elastic recovery followed by additional More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.24 Globular carbides at the surface of a carburized 1%Cr-Mo steel (reheat quenched). 960× More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 3.25 Surface film carbide (1 %Cr-Mo steel). 960× More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 10-13 Oil well drilling casting converted from nodular cast iron to a Cr-Mo steel casting because of field failure More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 4 Compound zone thickness versus nitriding time for 36H3M 3% Cr-Mo steel plasma nitrided at 530 °C (985 °F) in the atmosphere of 50% nitrogen + 50% hydrogen (upper curve) and 15% nitrogen + 85% hydrogen (bottom curve) based on the experimental data of Marciniak ( Ref 14 ). The graph More
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Published: 01 December 1989
Fig. 7.22. Relationships between stress rupture and time for Cr-Mo steels in hydrogen and in argon at a pressure of 10 MPa (1400 psi) ( Ref 57 ). More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 3-5 Grooved roll for steel mill of Cr-Mo alloy steel, 120 in. (3048 mm) roll face, 45 in. (1143 mm diameter, 74,940 lb (33,985 kg). Back-up roll suspended from overhead crane weighs 95,000 lb (43,082 kg). More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9.18 (a) Lath martensite in a steel with C < 0.16%, Mo = 0.3–0.6%, Cr = 0.6–1.2%, Cu 0.2–0.5% V ≤ 0.1%V. (b) Plate martensite (with twins) in the high carbon layer of a carburized AISI 4118 steel. TEM. Courtesy of H.-J. Kestenbach, UFSCar, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.38 The evolution of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel electroslag remelted as a function of the degree of hot working (compare with Fig. 11.37 , obtained with a conventional ingot). Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.61 Tool steel containing C = 1.60%, Mn = 0.90%, Cr = 1.50%, Mo = 0.55%, Ni = 0.70%, and W = 0.20% overheated. (a) Coarse primary carbides (right, in the image) pearlite matrix with carbides in network on the previous austenitic grain boundaries. (b) Detail of the complex carbides More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.22 CCT curve for F22 (2.25 Cr 1 Mo) steel. Circled numbers are as-quenched HV hardness values. Martensite formation is almost impossible in this steel. However, there is a very wide range of cooling rates that lead to bainite formation. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 29 Fretting fatigue at the surface of a Cr-Mo-V steel More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.26 Quenched and tempered 0.23% C, 3.4% Ni, 1.7% Cr, 0.5% Mo steel showing oxidation penetrating the austenitic grain boundaries. The austenite grain boundaries are also delineated, because they are decorated with carbides. Vilella’s reagent. 500× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.30 A water-quenched 0.27% C, 1.0% Mn, 1.02% Cr, 0.27% Mo steel showing prior austenite grain boundaries. The dark bands are due to segregation in the bar. Modified Winsteard’s etch. 250× More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.20 Microstructures of ferritic stainless steel containing 24.5% Cr, 3.54% Mo, 3.90% Ni, 0.17% Nb, and 0.32% Al annealed at 850 °C (1560 °F). (a) Annealed 100 min. Arrow points to chi phase. (b) Annealed 300 min. Dominant second phase (etched gray) is sigma. Light micrographs. Source More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.35 Granular bainite in a 0.2% C, 0.3% Mn, 3% Ni, 1.5% Cr, and 0.4% Mo steel. 4% picral etch. 800× More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 4 K Ic for a martensitic 0.45C-Ni-Cr-Mo-V steel as a function of inclusion spacing and yield strength. Source: Ref 3 More