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Contact stresses

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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.12 Contact stress profile between two meshing gear teeth More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.51 Allowable contact stress number for carburized and hardened steel More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 6 Surface durability curve for gear life rating (contact stress vs. cycles) for normal industry quality material (Grade 1 per Ref 2 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.25 Relationship between fatigue limit at 10 7 cycles and contact stress for case-hardened 20Kh2N4A test pieces (7.5 mm diam, 1.1 to 1.5 mm case depth). Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 15 Contact stress profile between two meshing gear teeth More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 52 Allowable contact stress number for carburized and hardened steel More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 16 Rough schematic of stresses in contact loading of a bearing ball on a race More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.uhcf3.t53630189
EISBN: 978-1-62708-270-9
... Abstract The wear caused by contact stress fatigue is the result of a wide variety of mechanical forces and environments. This chapter discusses the characteristics of four types of contact stress fatigue on mating metal surfaces: surface, subsurface, subcase, and cavitation. Features...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250293
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... of gear tooth, life determined by contact stress and bending stress, analysis of gear tooth failure by breakage after pitting, and metallurgical flaws that reduce the life of gears. The chapter briefly reviews some components in the design and structure of each gear and/or gear train that must...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.ffub.t53610461
EISBN: 978-1-62708-303-4
... Abstract This chapter discusses the causes and effects of wear along with prevention methods. It covers abrasive, erosive, erosion-corrosion, grinding, gouging, adhesive, and fretting wear. It also discusses various forms of contact-stress fatigue, including subsurface-origin fatigue, surface...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250227
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... produces a wear- and fatigue-resistant surface on gear teeth and is used in applications where gears are not subjected to high shock loads or contact stress. It is useful for gears that need to maintain their surface hardness at elevated temperatures. Gears used in industrial, automotive, and aerospace...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 September 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.gmpm.t51250311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-345-4
... dimensional, surface finish texture, metallurgical, and residual stress. The following section presents the tests that simulate gear action, namely the rolling contact fatigue test, the single-tooth fatigue test, the single-tooth single-overload test, and the single-tooth impact test. Finally, the chapter...
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Published: 01 December 1999
Fig. 8.19 Effect of roller burnishing of a 20Kh2N4A steel (case depth, 1.1 to 1.5 mm) on hardness and depth of hardening for various rolling pressures (maximum contact stress). Source: Ref 27 More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.38 White-etching features in a butterfly morphology around an inclusion particle in a quench and tempered steel subjected to cyclic contact stresses. Light micrograph. Reprinted with permission from ASTM STP987 Effect of Steel Manufacturing Processes on the Quality of Bearing Steels More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-12. Stress distribution in contacting surfaces due to rolling, sliding, and combined effect. More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 6 Elastic stress distribution: convex surfaces in contact. (a) Rolls turning at same speed. (b) Rolls turning at different speeds More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.8 Stress distribution in contacting surfaces due to rolling, sliding, and combined effect More
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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 7.3 Relationship between contact pressure and frictional shear stress More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 15 Stress distribution in contacting surfaces due to rolling, sliding, and combined effect More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 5 Effect of internal lubricants on the sliding wear (acetal against steel) of 27 tooth, 2.12 module (12 pitch), involute thermoplastic spur gears. Initial contact stress = 42 MPa 9 (6 ksi). Pitchline velocity = 5.6 m/s (18.4 ft/s). Solid lines show median of measured wear range. Dotted More