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Carbon equivalent

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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.11 Simplified phase diagram of iron-carbon system of a carbon equivalent with silicon at 2% Si More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 9 Relationship between carbon equivalent (C eq ) and quench cracking frequency. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 6 Effect of carbon equivalent on the tensile strength of flake, compacted, and spheroidal graphite irons cast in 30 mm (1.2 in.) diam bars More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.41 Relationship between carbon equivalent and tensile strength. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 9.29 Effect of carbon equivalent and modulus on expansion pressure. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 11.4 Relationship between tensile strength and carbon equivalent. SNG 500/7 = UK spec. spheroidal graphite iron (ductile iron) with tensile strength of 500 MPa and elongation of 7%, equivalent to ASTM grade 80-55-06 More
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.4 Effect of carbon equivalence on tensile strength of gray iron. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 3 General influence of carbon equivalence (CE) on the tensile strength of gray iron. Although increasing the carbon content improves graphitization potential and therefore decreases chilling tendency, the strength is adversely affected. More
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Published: 01 January 2022
Fig. 7.3 Tensile strength, section thickness and carbon equivalence relationship. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.59 Quenching crack susceptibility as a function of the “equivalent carbon” used as a measure for hardenability. Source: Ref 13 More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.pht2.t51440207
EISBN: 978-1-62708-262-4
... Abstract This chapter is a detailed account of heat treating techniques for cast irons (gray and ductile), providing the reader with a basic understanding of the differences among various types of cast irons and the concept of carbon equivalent. The types of heat treatments discussed are stress...
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Published: 01 June 2008
Fig. 24.22 Influence of carbon/silicon (C/Si) ratio on temper graphite clusters. CE, carbon equivalent. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 17.9 Diagram indicating the expected microstructure as a function of carbon and silicon content, carbon equivalent (CE = % C + 1/3 (% Si + % P)) and cooling rate, expressed as the casting wall thickness ( R ), which is part of the graphitization constant equation K g = C (Si + log R More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 7 The effect of silicon on mechanical properties of CG irons produced by the in-mold process. Carbon equivalents ranged from 4.33 to 4.45. More
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Published: 01 December 2001
Fig. 6 Influence of inoculation on tensile strength of gray irons as a function of carbon equivalent for 30 mm (1.2 in.) diam bars. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 30 Graville diagram showing susceptibility of steels to hydrogen-induced cold cracking relative to carbon content and carbon equivalent (CE), where CE = %C + (%Mn + %Si)/6 (%Ni + %Cu)/15 + (%Cr + %Mo + %V)/5. Susceptibility to cold cracking progressively increases as steels migrate from More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 17 Graville diagram showing susceptibility of steels to hydrogen-induced cold cracking relative to carbon content and carbon equivalent (CE), where CE = %C + (%Mn + %Si)/6 (%Ni + %Cu)/15 + (%Cr + %Mo + %V)/5. Susceptibility to cold cracking progressively increases as steels migrate from More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 10.7 Eutectic cementite (white) of an as-cast white iron with pearlite (gray). The gray areas were austenite during solidification but are transformed to pearlite during solid-state cooling. (a) Sand-cast white iron (3.6C-0.41Si-0.46Mn-0.98Cr-0.15P-0.024S) with carbon equivalent of 3.7 More
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Published: 01 July 1997
Fig. 1 Relationship between heat-affected zone (HAZ) volume fraction of martensite and the P cm carbon equivalents of thermally cycled specimens. Four thermal programs are included: (1) peak temperature ( T p ) = 1350 °C (2460 °F), cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (Δ t 8/5 ) = 3 s; (2) T More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aub.t61170091
EISBN: 978-1-62708-297-6
...: Higher tensile strength at the same carbon equivalent, which reduces the need for expensive alloying elements such as nickel, chromium, copper, and molybdenum Higher ratio of tensile strength to hardness Much higher ductility and toughness, which result in a higher safety margin against fracture...