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Cables

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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH42.2 Snapped tail rotor pitch control cables More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the failure of an aircraft control cable and the investigation that followed. It explains how visual examination showed that the failure occurred in a heavily worn section that runs over a pulley. Further examination under a stereoscope and in a SEM found that 40...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the failure of an aileron control cable in an aircraft and explains how investigators determined the cause. Based on their observations and the results of SEM fractography, investigators concluded that the cable had been damaged by a shearing tool, leading to its...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract This chapter discusses the failure of a control cable on an aircraft and the findings of an investigation that followed. The cable was made of stranded steel wire that was visibly worn. All seven strands had snapped and bore evidence of corrosion, pitting, nicks, and rubbing. Based...
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH12.1 Snapped aileron control cable and another cable in service More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 3.84 Principle of cable sheathing. 1, extrusion stem; 2, container; 3, cable sheathing material; 4, die head; 5, cable sheath; 6, cable core; 7, die; 8, hollow mandrel; 9, detachable point. The billet is placed in the container and pushed into a feeder chamber. The cable slips through More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 2 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum shielding in buried telephone cable coupled to buried copper plates. Courtesy of R. Baboian, Texas Instruments, Inc. More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 3 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum in buried power cable splice (copper to aluminum). Courtesy of R. Baboian, Texas Instruments, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2019
Figure 5 (a) Pogo tower (hard dock) and (b) cable docking (soft dock) solution. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 30 Arresting gear hook-point showing vertical cracking in the cable groove and evidence of localized heating (from the temper colors in the cable groove) More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 13.22 (a) Cable produced from composite strands, (b) Braid. More
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Published: 01 June 1983
Figure 13.23 Reinforced multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconducting cable (courtesy of Intermagnetics General Corporation). More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 2-57 Cable bend saddle for Narrows suspension bridge. Weight 87,000 lb (39,462 kg) More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH40.1 Strands of wires found snapped in a wing control cable More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. CH42.5 Broken strands of the tail rotor pitch control cable More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 2 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum shielding in buried telephone cable coupled to buried copper plates More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 3 Galvanic corrosion of aluminum in buried power cable splice (copper to aluminum) More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.66 Semiflexible coaxial cable used to transmit power between medium- or low-frequency power supplies and heat stations: (a) cross section of coaxial cable and (b) cable “broken out” for assembly Source: American Induction Heating Corp. More
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Published: 01 June 1988
Fig. 8.67 Water-cooled flexible coaxial cable used in radio-frequency induction heating to connect the inductor to the power supply Source: L. C. Miller Co. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 2.3 Extruded solder with several flux cores, lead sheathed cable, and window spacer sections in lead alloys for double glazed windows, as well as lead lines for fishing nets and curtain weights. Source: Collin More