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Burners

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Published: 01 August 2012
Fig. 5.27 Tooling design for warm forming in a hydraulic press using gas ring burners. Source: Ref 5.13 More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 20.17 Die heating system utilizing resistance heaters and gas burners [ Kulkarni, 1978 ] More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 13.2 Burner rig testing showing (a) specimens and test configuration and (b) operation More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.10 The dynamic burner rig used by Lai ( Ref 36 ) for simulating a gas turbine combustion environment in evaluating the oxidation/nitridation behavior of gas turbine combustor alloys. Courtesy of Haynes International, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.17 Alloys 230 (a), 617 (b), and X (c) after the dynamic burner rig testing at 870 °C (1600 °F) for 2000 h with 30 min cycles. Alloy 230 revealed no nitrides, alloy 617 showed both chromium nitrides (blocky phases) and aluminum nitrides (needle phases), and alloy X showed only blocky More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.6 Results of burner rig tests at 900 °C (1650 °F) with 50 ppm sea salt using No. 2 fuel oil (0.4% S) for combustion at 35:1 air-to-fuel ratio for alloys 230, 188, and 25. Source: Lai et al. ( Ref 23 ) More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.faesmch.t51270126
EISBN: 978-1-62708-301-0
... Abstract A test flight was cut short after a fire warning came on indicating a problem with one of the four engines on an aircraft. A visual examination following the precautionary landing revealed several burned hoses, a melted bolt, and fuel leaking from the base of the main burner. The fuel...
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.19 A corroded carbon steel tube sample from the waterwall of a boiler (subcritical unit) retrofitted with a low NO x burner system with overfire air ports. The waterwall tube suffered accelerated wastage after the furnace was retrofitted with NO x burner system. Courtesy of Welding More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080249
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
...), which was the first laboratory test method, is not considered reliable for simulating the gas turbine environment ( Ref 14 , 15 ). The salt-coated method is quite popular in academia for studying corrosion mechanisms. Engine manufacturers, however, use the burner rig test system to determine relative...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2007
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.htcma.t52080259
EISBN: 978-1-62708-304-1
... Abstract This chapter discusses material-related problems associated with coal-fired burners. It explains how high temperatures affect heat-absorbing surfaces in furnace combustion areas and in the convection pass of superheaters and reheaters. It describes how low-NOx combustion technology...
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 15.1 Temperature-strength capability of selected superalloys as a function of year of availability (about 1945–1970). (a) Compressor and turbine disks, (b) burner cans and combustors, (c) turbine vanes, and (d) turbine blades More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.18 Extensive blocky chromium nitrides formed in Type 310SS after testing in the dynamic burner rig testing at 870 °C (1600 °F) for 2000 h with 30 min cycles. Courtesy of Haynes International, Inc. More
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Published: 01 December 2003
Fig. 6 External gas-heated fluidized bed with recuperator. The use of regenerative burners where the exhaust gas temperature is only 200 °C (390 °F) achieves efficiencies similar to those of electrically heated furnaces. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.16 Extensive internal blocky chromium nitrides formed in alloy 556 (a), Type 310 (b), and alloy 800H (c) after the dynamic burner rig testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h with 30 min cycles. Courtesy of Haynes International, Inc. More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.14 Comparison weight change data between the thermal cycling test (30 min cycles) and no thermal cycle test during the dynamic burner rig testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h for alloys 230, X, 617, and 263. Source: Ref 36 , 37 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.15 Comparison nitrogen gain data between the thermal cycling test (30 min cycles) and no thermal cycle test during the dynamic burner rig testing at 980 °C (1800 °F) for 1000 h for alloys 230, X, 617, and 263. Source: Ref 36 , 37 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.1 Relative hot corrosion resistance of cobalt-base alloys obtained from burner rig tests using 3% S residual oil and 325 ppm NaCl in fuel (equivalent to 5 ppm NaCl in air) at 870 °C (1600 °F) for 600 h. Source: Beltran ( Ref 21 ) More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 10.43 Type 309 overlay on the waterwall in another supercritical unit equipped with low NO x burners and overfire air after service for 8 years, showing no sign of metal wastage or circumferential cracking. The boiler reportedly burned bituminous coal containing 3 to 3.5% S. Courtesy More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 4.20 Scanning electron micrograph showing the oxide scale of alloy MA956 after testing in the dynamic burner rig at 1150 °C (2100 °F) with 30 min cycle. The results of the energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis of the oxide scale are summarized: 1, Fe-Al-rich oxide; 2–4 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.3 Relative hot corrosion resistance of experimental alloys obtained from burner rig tests at 950 and 1040 °C (1750 and 1900 °F) for 100 h, using 1% S diesel fuel, 30:1 air-to-fuel ratio, and 200 ppm sea-salt injection. Source: Bergman et al. ( Ref 22 ) More