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Blistering

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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 65 Hydrogen-induced blistering in a 9.5 mm (⅜ in.) thick carbon steel (ASTM A 285 Grade C) plate that had been in service 1 year in a refinery vessel. 1½× More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 35 Hydrogen blistering of a carbon steel shell of an absorber/stripper tower in the vapor recovery (light ends) section of a catalytic cracking unit. Note that the blisters have cracked open to the vessel interior. More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 41 High-temperature hydrogen attack in the form of blistering and laminar fissuring throughout the wall thickness of a carbon steel pipe More
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Published: 01 April 2013
Fig. 4 Typical flaws in seamless tubing, (a) blister, (b) gouge, (c) lamination, (d) lap (arrow), (e) pit, (f) plug scores, (g) rolled-in slugs, (h) scab, (i) seam (arrow). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.2 Photograph of an injection-molded steel component with blisters due to trapped binder during thermal decomposition. A few of the blisters are identified. More
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Published: 30 April 2020
Fig. 7.14 Photograph of blisters on an alumina component after partial binder removal. These blisters formed because molten binder migrated into previously open pores to hinder vapor release during heating. More
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Published: 01 December 2006
Fig. 5.39 Blisters on the tube surface of a SF-Cu-tube after annealing. (a) Transverse section. (b) External surface with line of blisters [ Die 76 ] More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 28 Extrusion blister. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 13 Microscopic photographs showing the recrystallized layer in both blistered and unblistered areas More
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Published: 01 March 2000
Fig. 14 Micrograph showing a blister at the junction of the recrystallized and unrecrystallized zones More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 14 Hydrogen blister in 19 mm (3/4 in.) steel plate from a spherical tank used to store anhydrous HF for 13.5 years. (a) Cross section of 152 mm (6 in.) diameter blister. (b) Stepwise cracking (arrow) at edge of hydrogen blister shown in (a). Source: Ref 57 More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. 2.22 Blisters in aluminum alloy extrusions More
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Published: 01 October 2005
Fig. 2.23 Transverse section of the blistered extrusions, showing cavities near the surface, about to open up More
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cub.t66910099
EISBN: 978-1-62708-250-1
... hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen-induced blistering, high-temperature hydrogen attack, and hydride formation). All these forms are addressed in this chapter in the context of aqueous corrosion. For each form, a general description is provided along with information on the causes and the list of metals...
Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 March 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aet.t68260187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-336-2
... into the extruded shapes, and to avoid other defects, such as cracking and blistering. Entrapping oxide or any nonmetallic inclusions can cause failure of the material due to a different, yet related, feature, such as surface or subsurface blisters and other undesirable surface defects. It is important to recognize...
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 4.2 The first macrograph of the microstructure of steel, Sorby’s 1864 macrograph of blister steel. Etched in very dilute nitric acid. 9× More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 11 Filiform corrosion of an aluminum aircraft skin around steel fasteners. (a) Before paint removal, showing paint cracking and blistering. (b) After paint removal More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 4 Examples of exfoliation rating EA (superficial). Specimens exhibit tiny blisters, thin slivers, flakes, or powder, with only slight separation of metal. Source: ASTM G 34 More
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Published: 01 December 2015
Fig. 33 Stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking in refinery plate steel. Note the stacked array of hydrogen blister cracks going through the thickness of the material (vertical) oriented perpendicular to the direction of the applied tensile stress (horizontal). More
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Published: 01 March 2001
Fig. 11 Illustration of the mechanism of corrosion for painted steel. (a) A void in the paint results in rusting of the steel, which undercuts the paint coating and results in further coating degradation. (b) Photograph showing blistering and/or peeling (undercutting) of paint where exposed More