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Bevel gears

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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 13 Three types of bevel gears and a hypoid gear More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 14 Angles and terminology for straight bevel gears More
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Published: 01 December 1995
Fig. 3-14 Cast tooth bevel gears produced by the shell molding process to obtain excellent surfaces and close tolerances More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 12 Examples of near-net shape forged gears. (a) Spiral bevel gear with a 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) stock allowance developed for use on gears with a DP less than 7. (b) Coarse-pitch (less than 5 DP) spur gear with a stock allowance of 1 to 2 mm (0.04 to 0.80 in.). Source: Presrite Corporation More
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Published: 01 February 2005
Fig. 22.22 (a) Bevel gear. (b) Punch used to form bevel gear [ Lange et al., 1992b ] More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 1-5. Two types of spiral bevel sets, consisting of spiral bevel gear and pinion. More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 1 Tooth contact lines on a spur gear (a), a bevel gear (b), and a low-angle helical gear (c). Lines on tooth faces of typical teeth are lines of contact. More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 47 Carburized 4817 steel spiral bevel gear failure. The gear broke from fatigue at acute-angle intersections of mounting holes and tooth-root fillets as a result of through hardening. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 1-4. Straight bevel gear and pinion. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 3-1. Spiral bevel gear, 2.5 D.P. SAE 4820H, case depth 0.068 in., 58 HRC. Operation: coal mining. Every tooth crushed and subsequently broken at toe end, midprofile, convex (loaded) side. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 3-12. Spiral bevel gear, 2/3×. Macroetching of two surfaces 180° apart from this gear reveals a major difference in material flow lines during the forging operation. The dark voids had contained several inclusions. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 3-14. Spiral bevel gear tooth, 3/4×. Macroetched to show a large inclusion, which is aluminum silicate from the wall of the steel-producing furnace. This inclusion was hard enough to break the gear tooth cutter edge, which then scored the rest of the tooth profile. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-8. Spiral bevel gear tooth, 0.7×. Tooth bending fatigue with origin at the apex of the drilled bolt hole, which terminated just below the root radius. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-23. Spiral bevel gear teeth, 1.5×. Original pitting low on the active profile gives initiation to a fast and extensive progression of spalling over the top face and down the back profile. This is often called the “cyclone effect.” More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-37. Spiral bevel gear and pinion set, 1.5×. Sheared in reverse direction. The pinion came to a sudden and complete stop at the instant of a primary failure of the unit, allowing the gear to shear the contacting teeth and to continue rotating over the failed area. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-41. Case crushing at midprofile of a spiral bevel gear tooth. Progression is from the subcase area into the core and outward to the surface. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-44. Spiral bevel gear teeth showing contact wear. Insert A is a tooth area nonworn. Insert B shows abrasive wear clearly cutting away 1/8 in. of the surface without damage to underlying material. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-48. Spiral bevel gear tooth. Internal rupture at top corner of case/core interface. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-49. Spiral bevel gear tooth. Internal rupture lifting the entire top of a tooth. More
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 5-12. Carburized spiral bevel gear fractured from fatigue originating at the acute angle intersection of the root fillet to the bolt hole. 5 More