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Bending fatigue

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... Abstract This data set contains the results of rotating-beam reversed-bending fatigue tests for a wide range of aluminum casting alloys. These fatigue curves are the results of tests on individual lots of material considered representative of the respective alloys and tempers. aluminum...
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Published: 01 June 1985
Fig. 4-6. Helical gear, 1.12×. Tooth bending fatigue followed by tooth bending impact. Origin is off-center of the tooth midpoint but is directly above the center of the web. More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.16 Core hardness vs. bending fatigue strength of gear tooth More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.17 Austenitic grain size and bending fatigue strength of a typical gear steel More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 5.27 Influence of retained austenite on bending fatigue strength More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 6.5 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged carburized and hardened gears More
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Published: 01 December 2000
Fig. 6.6 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged nitrided gears More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 6 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged carburized and hardened gears More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 7 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged nitrided gears More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 1 Spiral bevel pinion showing classic tooth-bending fatigue. The origin is at midlength of the root radius on the concave (loaded) side. Original magnification at 0.4× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 3 Spur tooth pinion at 0.5× (top) and 1.5× (bottom). Tooth-bending fatigue originating at the root radius (arrows), loaded side, one-third the distance from the open end. Progression was to the bore More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 4 Spur pinion failure. Tooth-bending fatigue with origin at root radius of loaded side at one end of the tooth. Original magnification at 0.6× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 5 Spur pinion failure. Tooth-bending fatigue is at midlength of the tooth at the root radius, but the origin is at an inclusion located in the case/core transition. Original magnification at 55× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 6 Spiral bevel gear tooth failure. Tooth-bending fatigue with origin at the apex of the drilled bolt hole, which terminated just below the root radius. Original magnification at 0.5× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 7 Bending-fatigue fracture in the heel of one tooth of a spiral bevel pinion of AISI 8617 steel, carburized and hardened to 57 HRC in the case. Fracture resulted from severe pitting. Note that pitting had begun in an adjoining tooth (near top). Original magnification at 0.75× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 8 Bending-fatigue fracture in two teeth of a reverse idler gear of AISI 8617 steel, carburized and hardened to 60 HRC in the case. Arrows point to the root fillets on both sides of each tooth, where fracture began due to excessive stress in these locations. Original magnification at ~2× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 9 Bending-fatigue fractures in several teeth of a spur gear of AISI 8620 steel, carburized and hardened to 60 HRC in the case. The tooth marked A apparently broke first, as the result of a fatigue crack that originated in the fillet to the left of the tooth (arrow). After this tooth broke More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 10 Surface of a bending-fatigue fracture in a tooth (upper tooth in this view) of a large spiral bevel pinion of AISI 8620 steel carburized and hardened to 60 HRC at the surface. The arrow marks the fatigue-crack origin, in the root fillet. The absence of this tooth resulted in fracture More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 3 Typical maximum stress ( S ) vs. number of cycles ( N ) bending fatigue plots for 6 carburized steels. R = –1. Source: Ref 4 SAE steel grade Composition, wt % C Mn Cr Mo 4120 0.19 1.03 0.52 0.19 4028 0.28 0.80 ... 0.25 PS59 0.17 1.20 0.90 More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 5 Example of a cantilever specimen used to evaluate bending fatigue of carburized steels. Specimen edges are rounded and maximum stress is applied at the location shown in Fig. 6 . Dimensions in millimeters More