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Bending fatigue

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.aacppa.t51140253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-335-5
... Abstract This data set contains the results of rotating-beam reversed-bending fatigue tests for a wide range of aluminum casting alloys. These fatigue curves are the results of tests on individual lots of material considered representative of the respective alloys and tempers. aluminum...
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 68 Comparison of bending fatigue of carburized 12Khn3 gears showing adverse effect of network carbides More
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Published: 01 October 2011
Fig. 16.29 Beach marks in two steel shafts that failed in rotating bending fatigue. (a) Curved beach marks are centered from one fatigue crack origin (arrow). (b) Fatigue fracture initiated at numerous sites along a sharp snap ring groove; ratchet marks appear as shiny spots along the surface More
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 21.33 Stress versus cycles for bending fatigue of 8719 steel. Specimens were either gas carburized or plasma carburized and direct quenched after carburizing or reheated as marked. Source: Ref 21.57 More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 26 Reversed bending fatigue of a 1.6-in.-diam shaft of 1046 steel with a hardness of approximately 30 HRC. Note the symmetrical fatigue pattern of beach marks on each side, with the final rupture on the diameter. This indicates that each side of the shaft was subjected to the same maximum More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 27 Reversed bending fatigue of an alloy-steel steering knuckle at a hardness level of 30 HRC with nonuniform application of stresses. The multiple-origin fatigue at the bottom was caused by the tendency of normal wheel loading to bend the spindle (lower right) of the knuckle upward More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 28 Reversed bending fatigue of a flat ¼-in. plate of a high-strength low-alloy steel test specimen, designed with tapered edges to prevent fatigue origin at the corners. Note the many separate origins on each side and the very thin final rupture region separating the two fatigue areas More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 29 Rotating bending fatigue fracture of a keyed shaft of grade 1040 steel, approximately 30 HRC. The fatigue crack originated at the lower left corner of the keyway and extended almost through the entire cross section before final rupture occurred. A prominent beach mark pattern More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 30 Rotating bending fatigue fracture of a 2-in.-diam grade 1035 steel shaft, hardness 143 HB. The part was designed with a large radius joining the shaft to the shoulder, but it was machined with a sharp tool mark in the fillet. Multiple-origin fatigue around the periphery proceeded More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 31 Rotating bending fatigue fracture in a grade 4817 steel shaft, carburized and hardened to a surface hardness of 60 HRC. The fracture started in six fillet areas around the periphery, near the runouts of six grooves. The six fatigue areas penetrated separately, but uniformly, to final More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 32 Bending fatigue fracture through the cheek of a diesel engine crankshaft. The very prominent steps and beach marks were the result of severe overloading during starting and clutching with a very aggressive friction material in the clutch. Though this was a laboratory test More
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Published: 30 November 2013
Fig. 40 Bending fatigue fractures in several teeth of a grade 8620 steel spur gear, carburized and hardened to 60 HRC in the case. It can be seen that tooth A fractured first, for it has the largest fatigue area, originating in the fillet on the arrow side of the tooth. Gear teeth More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 93 Bending fatigue response of furnace-hardened and induction-hardened medium-carbon steel tractor axles. Shaft diameter: 70 mm. Fillet radius: 1.6 mm. Source: Ref 45 More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 95 Bending fatigue strength of gear teeth at (a) tooth gap hardening and (b) flank hardening for various steels. Broken lines denote confidence limit according to DIN 3990. Source: Ref 36 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 2 Schematic of R.R. Moore reversed bending fatigue machine. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 32 Rotating-bending fatigue fracture of a keyed shaft of 1040 steel, approximately 30 HRC. The fatigue crack originated at the lower left corner of the keyway and extended almost through the entire cross section before final rupture occurred. A prominent beach mark pattern is visible More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 6 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged carburized and hardened gears More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 7 Bending-fatigue life of original and damaged nitrided gears More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 1 Spiral bevel pinion showing classic tooth-bending fatigue. The origin is at midlength of the root radius on the concave (loaded) side. Original magnification at 0.4× More
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Published: 01 September 2005
Fig. 3 Spur tooth pinion at 0.5× (top) and 1.5× (bottom). Tooth-bending fatigue originating at the root radius (arrows), loaded side, one-third the distance from the open end. Progression was to the bore More