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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 5.21 Residual stress patterns in cold-drawn 1045 steel bars. Bars were cold drawn 20% from 43 to 38 mm ( 1 11 16 to 1½ in.). Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 01 August 2005
Fig. A6.4 ASTM crack plane orientation identification code for drawn bars and hollow cylinders. C, chord of cylindrical cross section; R, radius of cylindrical cross section. First letter: normal to the fracture plane (loading direction); second letter: direction of crack propagation More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 13.3 Uncoated nickel-base superalloy erosion test bars after 899 °C (1650 °F) isothermal hot corrosion test. Left to right: cast Udimet 700, wrought Udimet 700, Waspaloy, IN-100, B-1900, MAR-M-246, INCO 728, and MC 102 More
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Published: 01 May 2018
FIG. 9.11 Finished bars of titanium that are forged into joint replacement parts. Source: www.surgicalimplanttitanium.blogspot.com . More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 12.22 (Part 3) (i) Variation of hardness with depth in bars pack carburized at 940 °C for 2 h, given the diffusion treatments indicated, and then quench hardened. More
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Published: 01 August 1999
Fig. 12.23 (Part 3) (g) Variation of hardness with depth in carburized bars subsequently decarburized and quench hardened. The structures of the mildly decarburized bar are illustrated in Fig. 12.23 (Part 1) (a) to (f) , and those of the moderately decarburized bar in Fig. 12.24 . More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 99 Jominy curves for end-quenched bars of (a) AISI 1050, (b) 4150, and (c) 4340 steels, austenitized conventionally and by short-time induction heating. Source: Ref 40 , 41 More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 10.4 Tensile test bars, hardness and microstructure locations More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.9 Cylindrical bars of AISI 4340 steel. Each figure presents the macrograph (no etching) and the corresponding micrograph. (a)–(c): Bars with 25 mm (1 in.) diameter, austenitized in a hydrogen atmosphere at 1120 °C (2050 °F) and subjected to isothermal heat treatment at 338 °C (640 °F More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.42 Determination of the critical diameter according to Grossmann. (a) Bars with different diameters are quenched and the hardness profile is measured along the bar diameter. (b) The results of hardness measurements on the center of the bars may be presented in a single plot where More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 10.43 Hardness along bar diameter for bars of three different steels containing C = 0.4% (see Table 10.1 for the rest of the relevant chemical composition). Bars quenched in oil and quenched in water. The effect of the alloying elements on hardenability is evident. The bar diameters More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 11.5 Transverse cross sections of round bars of AISI 10V45 steel rolled from a continuous cast billet of 178 x 178 mm (7 x 7 in.) cross section. The deformation ratio during rolling was measured as the ratio between the initial and final cross-sectional areas (a) 7:1, (b) 10:1, (c) 27:1 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.37 MIG-MAG weld joining two bars of steel with a specified minimum yield strength of 500 MPa (73 ksi) of 6.3 and 16 mm (0.25 and 0.63 in.) diameters. Bars produced by the Tempcore process. Hardness in each region of the microstructure is indicated. (a) Layer of tempered martensite. (b More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 2.9 Critical diameter as a function of diameter for round bars. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 August 2015
Fig. 9.4 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. See text for details. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 November 2007
Fig. 9.1 Rockwell hardness versus radius for 25 mm (1 in.) diameter bars of oil-quenched 1060 and 5160 steels More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 12 Schematic of the cathodic protection of steel reinforcing bars in concrete. Arrows indicate current to the steel. More
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Published: 01 September 2008
Fig. 13 Centerline cooling curves for oil-quenched steel bars of varying section sizes, assuming a surface heat-transfer coefficient of 0.019 cal s –1 °C –1 cm 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2012
Fig. 7 Ten different types of flaws that may be found in rolled bars. (a) Inclusions. (b) Laminations from spatter (entrapped splashes) during the pouring. (c) Slivers. (d) Scabs are caused by splashing liquid metal in the mold. (e) Pits and blisters caused by gaseous pockets in the ingot. (f More
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Published: 01 October 2012
Fig. 10.10 Fracture mechanism map for hot-pressed silicon nitride flexure bars. Source: Ref 10.8 More