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Austenitic stainless steel

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Series: ASM Technical Books
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.tb.cw.t51820043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-339-3
...Abstract Abstract Austenitic stainless steels exhibit a single-phase, face-centered cubic structure that is maintained over a wide range of temperatures. This chapter provides a basic understanding of grade designations, properties, and welding considerations of austenitic stainless steels...
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Published: 01 January 2015
Fig. 23.9 Microstructure of annealed type 316L austenitic stainless steel. (a) Etched in 20% HCl, 2% NH 4 FHF, 0.8% PMP ( Ref 23.12 , 23.13 ). (b) Etched in waterless Kalling’s reagent ( Ref 23.12 , 23.13 ). Light micrographs. Courtesy of G. Vander Voort, Carpenter Technology Corp., Reading, PA More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 1.11 Micrograph of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel showing a microstructure consisting of 100% austenite. The straight-edged areas (marked by arrows) within the grains are annealing twins. Electrolytically etched in 60 parts nitric acid in 40 parts water, stainless steel cathode, at 6 V More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 2.36 Austenite grains in an AISI/SAE 316 austenitic stainless steel. Straight-edged regions are annealing twins. 4% picral and HCl etch. 500× More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Schematic diagram of components of weldment in austenitic stainless steel More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 14.43 (a) Austenitic stainless steel cladding weld deposited over a substrate of 20MnMoNi55 steel. Heat-affected zone is visible, as is the columnar structure in the weld-deposited material, in multiple layers. The arrow indicates a slag inclusion defect, detected during ultrasonic More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.11 AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel annealed at 1050 °C (1920 °F) and water quenched. Austenite. Etchant: oxalic acid. Courtesy of Villares Metals S.A., Sumaré, SP, Brazil. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.12 W. Nr. 1.4439 austenitic stainless steel, forged, annealed for solubilization, and quenched. Austenite with grain size ASTM 2–4. More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.13 W. Nr. 1.4439 austenitic stainless steel, forged, annealed for solubilization, and quenched. Austenite with grain size ASTM 0–1. Large grain sizes in austenitic stainless steels may lead to yield strength below specified limits and difficulties (or impossibility) in performing More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 16.45 (a) AISI 310 austenitic stainless steel annealed at 1060 °C (1940 °F) for 1 h followed by water quenching and a simulated sensitization treatment at 675°C (1245 °F) for 1 h, followed by air-cooling. Etchant: electrolytic oxalic acid at 10% current density of 1 A/cm 2 . Rejected More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 6.122 Optical micrograph showing PASCC in an austenitic stainless steel pipe, 100× More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.18 Microstructure of austenitic stainless steel More
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Published: 01 December 2018
Fig. 3.23 Microstructure of sensitized austenitic stainless steel More
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Published: 01 March 2006
Fig. 2 Typical equiaxed grain structure in a type 316L austenitic stainless steel that was solution annealed at 955 °C (1750 °F) and etched with (a) waterless Kalling’s and (b) Beraha’s tint etch. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.3 Stress-corrosion cracking in an austenitic stainless steel (0.1% C, 1% Si, 2% Mn, 18% Cr, 10% Ni, 2% Mo, 0.6% Ti) caused by MgCl 2 solution at approximately 100 °C (212 °F). Transgranular rupture reveals feathery pattern. Original magnification: 5500×. Source: Ref 18.7 More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.4 Intergranular fracture of type 304 austenitic stainless steel following exposure to an aqueous CuSO 4 + H 2 SO 4 solution. (a) Primary rupture plane is shown intersecting the surface. Note the secondary intergranular cracks. Original magnification: 650×. (b) Classic intergranular More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.5 Stress-corrosion cracking failure of a type 304 austenitic stainless steel bolt exposed to seacoast environment. (a) Lateral view demonstrating absence of gross ductility. (b) Brittle fracture surface with corrosion staining on facets and distinct overload rupture region. (c) Schematic More
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Published: 01 January 2017
Fig. 18.6 Transgranular SCC of type 304 austenitic stainless steel following prolonged seacoast service. (a) Painted exterior side of tank exposed to environment. (b) View of representative macroscopic fracture surface. Note the brittle, faceted appearance. More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.45 Heavily cold-worked AISI/SAE 301 austenitic stainless steel. Electrolytically etched in 10% oxalic acid solution using a stainless steel cathode at 8 V. Enhanced by differential interference contrast illumination (also called Nomarski illumination). 500× More
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Published: 01 March 2002
Fig. 8.46 Annealed AISI/SAE 316 austenitic stainless steel showing grain boundaries but the absence of twins. Ideal for grain size measurements by image analysis. Electrolytically etched with 60% nitric acid and 40% water using a platinum cathode at 5 V. 500× More